Articles on Extreme rainfall

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Frost affected many crops across WA during September 2016. WA Department of Primary Industry and Regional Development

Not just heat: even our spring frosts can bear the fingerprint of climate change

We already know that climate change makes heatwaves hotter and longer. But a new series of research papers asks whether there is also a climate fingerprint on frosty spells and bouts of wet weather.
Houston’s Interstate Highway 45 was totally submerged in the deluge. REUTERS/Richard Carson

Is Hurricane Harvey a harbinger for Houston’s future?

The unpredictability of hurricanes makes it hard to say for sure whether climate change is making them worse. But we do know that sea-level rise and increased evaporation will worsen the impacts.
The Acros Fukuoka eco-building in Fukuoka, Japan boasts one of the world’s most famous green roofs. The GRIT Lab at the University of Toronto is working to bring green roofs to the city and beyond in order to combat climate change. (Shutterstock)

How green roofs can protect city streets from flooding

Green roofs could play a critical role in helping cities cope with extreme rainfall events in the age of climate change. The roofs essentially suck up stormwater like sponges if designed properly.
Climate change is already delivering more extremes of wet and dry to the Pacific region. EPA/FRANCIS R. MALASIG

Droughts and flooding rains already more likely as climate change plays havoc with Pacific weather

New research shows that global warming has already begun to exacerbate extremes of rainfall in the Pacific region – with more to come.
Rural southern Australia has been drying out over the past several decades. Pictured here, Burra in South Australia. David Jones

Hasta la vista El Niño – but don’t hold out for ‘normal’ weather just yet

Australia is the land of drought of flooding rains, driven by events such as El Nino. But despite this variability, some parts of Australia are clearly drying out.
Places near the equator, with less natural climate variation, were the first to see humanity’s climate fingerprint. Husond/Wikimedia Commons

Ground zero for climate change: the tropics were first to feel the definite effects in the 1960s

Global warming is, by definition, experienced worldwide. But a new study shows that the tropics were the first places on earth where the human effect on climate outstripped normal climate variations.

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