Articles on Global perspectives

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In February, thousands of women marched in Mexico City to demand that President Andrés Manuel López Obrador do more to keep women safe. The protest sign featured here reads, ‘Don’t be indifferent.’ Reuters/Edgard Garrido/Reuters

Mexican president López Obrador has a woman problem

Mexico is the second most dangerous country for women in Latin America. Yet the new government is slashing funding for programs meant to protect and empower women.
Some African journalists are concerned that foreign funders may influence what they cover and how. EPA-EFE/Jayden Joshua

Donor-funded journalism is on the rise in Africa: why it needs closer scrutiny

Western aid has resulted in an Anglo-American culture of journalism education which has proved impractical to implement in African countries with illiberal political regimes.
A neuro-otologist at the University of Miami reported “central vestibular” (inner ear) findings in 36 per cent of American diplomats and their families affected by Havana syndrome. (Shutterstock)

‘Havana syndrome’ symptoms of diplomats in Cuba are not mass hysteria

Multiple sclerosis and endometriosis in women both used to be diagnosed as hysteria. The same could be happening with 'Havana syndrome.'
Forest restoration is underway in Biliran, Leyte, Philippines led by the local community with support from international researchers and government agencies. Robin Chazdon

High-value opportunities exist to restore tropical rainforests around the world – here’s how we mapped them

Restoring tropical rainforests is good for the climate, wild species and humans. But where to start? A new study pinpoints locations that will maximize benefits and minimize negative impacts.
The New IRA apologized for killing investigative journalist Lyra McKee during a riot in Derry. Reuters/Charles McQuillan

Why do rebel groups apologize?

Organizations try to hide mistakes and evade responsibility, studies show. But two scholars analyzing militant and terrorist groups say they are willing to acknowledge their mistakes – sometimes.
Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama sits on his ceremonial chair at Tsuglakhang temple in Dharmsala, India. AP Photo/Ashwini Bhatia

How the Dalai Lama is chosen and why China wants to appoint its own

Winner of the 1992 Nobel Peace Prize and one of the most recognizable faces of Buddhism, the Dalai Lama has turned 84 and the question of a successor is pressing – and controversial.

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