Articles on Indonesia

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The female ghost in Indonesia’s most recent horror movie is scary. But the data on maternal mortality rates and sexual violence against women are scary too. Rapi Films

Indonesian folklore of vengeful female ghosts hold symbols of violence against women

A new movie about a female ghost has scared millions in Indonesia. Female ghosts have been center stage in Indonesian folklore and their stories can serve as a warning to the state of women today.
Balinese farmers with Mount Agung in the background. Areas with high volcanic activity also have some of the world’s most fertile farmlands. Reuters/Darren Whiteside

How Mount Agung’s eruption can create the world’s most fertile soil

Volcanic ash can cause a nuisance to farmers, burying agricultural lands and damaging crops. But in the long term, this ash will create highly productive soil that can support huge populations.
It is difficult to find two G20 neighbours which trade and invest in each other as little as Australia and Indonesia do. Shutterstock.com

Australia tries to unlock the benefits of proximity with Indonesia

Trade and investment between Indonesia and Australia is very little despite their proximity. But there are signs of change in the way Australia thinks about Indonesia.
Rush-hour traffic in Jakarta on 13 June 2017. If not for fuel subsidy cuts, the congestion could have been even worse. Reuters/Beawiharta

Indonesia’s fuel subsidy cuts prevented even worse traffic jams

Traffic continues to increase, but more slowly than would have been the case if the reforms had not gone ahead.
Families should be more involved in digital literacy education as parents are the ones who introduce digital media to their children. Shutterstock.com

Researchers find Indonesia needs more digital literacy education

Dozens of voluntary researchers in nine Indonesian cities mapped digital literacy activities and they found the country needs much more to solve their digital media problems.
The complete ban on burning peatlands, while effective in reducing forest and land fires, may in the long run harm the local agriculture industry. Reuters/Beawiharta

Zero-burning policy hurts small farmers – a flexible approach is needed

Zero-burning policy could hurt small-holder farmers. The ban on the use of fire for land clearing has raised the costs to prepare their land for planting and to keep it pest-free.
Communicative and responsive leaders could well be the main ingredient for citizens to participate. www.shutterstock.com

Responsive leaders needed to encourage citizen participation

Complaint systems, such as the government initiative LAPOR!, will fail to build trust if bureaucracies are unresponsive.
In 2014, Indonesia ratified an ASEAN treaty to tackle transboundary haze in the region. But, as of now, Indonesia has yet to enact regulations at the national and local level. Reuters/Antara News Agency

Indonesia drags its feet on ASEAN haze treaty

It took 11 years after the treaty came into force for Indonesia to ratify the agreement in 2014. But two years in, Indonesia has yet to enact regulations at the national and local level.
Migrants from Myanmar at the gate of an immigration detention center in Medan on 5 April 2013. Relevant government officials in Indonesia acknowledge that immigration detention facilities should not be used for housing refugees and asylum seekers. But finding alternatives to detention to accommodate asylum seekers has been difficult. Reuters/Roni Bintang

Indonesian cities and regencies may be asked to shelter refugees – will they comply?

A new decree states that local administrations may be asked to provide shelter for asylum seekers and refugees. In reality, this may be rather challenging.
School children read books at Palipis beach in Mandar, West Sulawesi. The books were brought by library boat. Pattingalloang, which was part of a network of moving libraries called Pustaka Bergerak. Urwa/Pustaka Bergerak

Disadvantaged Indonesians defy the perception that they’re not interested in reading

Indonesian politicians and public figures say Indonesians have a low interest in reading. But people in disadvantaged areas defy this perception; they always welcome new books with joy.
Trash washed up on Bali’s Kuta beach on February 2016. Reuters/Antara News Agency

How can Indonesia win against plastic pollution?

To stop Indonesia polluting the ocean with plastic it is important to change the country's land-based waste management.
Children fly their kites on a demolished neighboyrhood in Jakarta. Studies show inequality and injustice are highly toxic to our health and wellbeing. Beawiharta/Reuters

Inequality harms health and well-being of all Indonesians – not just the poor

Inequality is bad for all Indonesians, including the middle and upper classes, because it causes more violence, more people with mental illness and less chance for us to better our lives.

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