Articles on Latin American politics

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Colombia ended its 52-year conflict with the FARC guerrillas in late 2016. The next president must decide whether to uphold the deal. AP Photo/Ivan Valencia

Colombia’s presidential runoff will be a yet another referendum on peace

Two candidates from Colombia's May 27 presidential vote will face off on June 17. One is a former guerrilla. The other is a hard-liner. Their views for the nation's future couldn't be more different.
Fewer than 20 countries worldwide have recognized the re-election of Nicolás Maduro as Venezuela’s president. Reuters/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Venezuela is now a dictatorship

Maduro's landslide May 20 re-election marks the official death of democracy in Venezuela. Dozens of nations worldwide have declared the vote illegitimate, and the US imposed new sanctions.
Despite his 20 percent approval rate, President Nicolas Maduro is almost assured a win in Venezuela’s May 20 election. The opposition says the vote is a “farce.” REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Venezuelans are boycotting their presidential election

The Venezuelan opposition is asking people not to vote in the country's May 20 election, which they call a 'farce.' President Maduro regime has jailed or blacklisted most of his competitors.
With over a dozen candidates and an incarcerated front-runner, Brazil’s 2018 presidential election has political analysts shrugging their shoulders. AP Photo/Leo Correa

Brazilian candidate still crushing his rivals from jail

Leftist former President Lula da Silva is the clear favorite in Brazil's 2018 presidential race, leading his closest rival — a firebrand conservative — by 15 points. The only problem: He's in jail.
Mario Abdo Benítez, or ‘Marito,’ as he’s known, is the son of the private secretary to Paraguayan dictator Alfredo Stroessner. Reuters/Andres Stapff

Paraguay’s new president recalls an old dictatorship

Paraguay's conservative president-elect Mario Abdo narrowly won the April 22 election. His father was the private secretary for dictator Alfredo Stroessner, who brutally ruled Paraguay for 35 years.
Protests against social security reforms in Nicaragua quickly gained traction. Now, even the Catholic Church is suggesting ‘democratization’ may be on the horizon. Reuters/Oswaldo Rivas

Nicaragua protests threaten an authoritarian regime that looked like it might never fall

For 11 years, Daniel Ortega's regime has been unshakable. But Nicaragua's autocratic leader is vulnerable after weeks of deadly protest. Now, some citizens are calling for him to resign.
Some 200,000 Argentinean women marched on March 8 for International Women’s Day. Many proclaimed their support for legalizing abortion. AP Photo/Tomas F. Cuesta

Argentina’s abortion legalization debate ignites soul searching on women’s rights

A new bill that would legalize abortion in Argentina has spurred surprise debate on the gender pay gap, parental leave and political representation. Will Argentinean women finally get their due?
Bolivia’s Evo Morales and Venezuela’s Nicolás Maduro are both classic Latin American strongmen. But that’s where the similarities end. David Mercado/Reuters

Bolivia is not Venezuela – even if its president does want to stay in power forever

Bolivia's populist leader has been in office for 12 years. He's a thorn in the US's side and an ally of the late Hugo Chávez. Now he's running for a fourth term. But that doesn't make him a dictator.
Adios Raúl, hola Miguel. smael Francisco/Courtesy of Cubadebate/Handout via Reuters

Cuba’s getting a new president

Miguel Díaz-Canel, a 57-year-old engineer and Communist Party loyalist, is expected to succeed Raúl Castro as president of Cuba. Will change bring prosperity or instability to the Cuban people?
The Venezuelans now rushing across the border to seek refuge in Brazil join millions of Brazilian migrants who’ve been displaced within their own country. Nacho Doce/Reuters

Venezuelan refugees inflame Brazil’s already simmering migrant crisis

Since 2000, 8.8 million Brazilians have been displaced by disaster, development and crime, new data shows. Now Venezuelan migrants are pouring into the country. Still, Brazil has no real refugee plan.
Mexico’s new app makes it a snap for political independents to collect voter signatures — unless, of course, their supporters don’t have smartphones or live in rural areas without reliable internet. Reuters

Want to be president of Mexico? There’s an app for that

Almost 50 independents want to run for president of Mexico in 2018. But only a handful will likely make the ballot, in part due to the glitchy election app voters must use to show their support.
Venezuela’s crisis has been terrible for years. But if President Maduro is re-elected, things could actually get worse. Marco Bello/Reuters

Why an election won’t topple Venezuela’s Maduro

The Venezuelan government has just announced that it will hold a presidential election by the end of April. Despite pervasive hunger and discontent, democracy still doesn't stand a chance.
Intersectionality in action: Brazilian women are organizing across class and race lines to decry inequality in a country that remains deeply ‘machista.’ Naco Doce/Reuters

Beyond #MeToo, Brazilian women rise up against racism and sexism

Before #MeToo, Brazilian women launched #MyFirstHarrassment and marched for racial equality. Today, this feminist resurgence is tackling health care, plastic surgery, violence and more.
Donald Trump says cheap Mexican labor is hurting American workers. But isn’t it also hurting Mexican workers? AP Photo/Guillermo Arias

How Trump’s NAFTA renegotiations could help Mexican workers

Trump has attacked NAFTA, saying that cheap, under-regulated Mexican labor hurts American workers. If he's right, then NAFTA negotiations could be a chance to push Mexico on workers' rights.

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