Articles on marine protected areas

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The West Moberly First Nation would like to see biodiversity-rich riparian areas in the Peace River Valley, in northeastern British Columbia protected. They will be destroyed by the Site C hydro dam, currently under construction. Garth Lenz

Protecting not-so-wild places helps biodiversity

Countries can protect biodiversity and recognize Indigenous peoples as conservation partners.
Nature offers many benefits to people. (Shutterstock)

It pays to invest in biodiversity

Governments around the world have vowed to halt the loss of global biodiversity by 2020, but without more investment, we'll miss some of the targets.
A large female Greenland shark observed near the community of Arctic Bay, Nunavut. (Brynn Devine)

Caught on camera: Ancient Greenland sharks

Using baited cameras scientists have captured some of the first underwater video footage of the elusive Greenland shark.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his wife Sophie Grégoire Trudeau kayak in the Gulf Islands National Park Reserve, in British Columbia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

What Trudeau needs to do to become Canada’s first ‘Oceans Prime Minister’

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has taken swift action on protecting marine areas over the past two years, but he'll need to continue this momentum if he is to cement his legacy.
Whitespotted surgeonfish (Acanthurus guttatus), found in the Indo-Pacific, crop the upper portion of algae while feeding, preventing macroalgae from becoming established on reefs. Kevin Lino/NOAA

Understanding the conditions that foster coral reefs’ caretaker fishes

Plant-eating fish control the spread of seaweed and algae on coral reefs. New research explaining why populations of these fish vary from site to site could lead to better reef protection strategies.
Steven Morgan deploys ABLE robots in a swimming pool to test how well their programs simulate larval behavior. University of California, Davis

Underwater robots help scientists see where marine larvae go and how they get there

Most ocean species start out as larvae drifting with currents. Using underwater robots, scientists have found that larvae use swimming motions to affect their course and reach suitable places to grow.

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