Articles on Pest control

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Learning about urban rat populations through genetic testing reveals information about their movements through cities. Shutterstock

Rat detective uses DNA to uncover how rats scurry around cities

Genetic analysis shows that urban rats prefer to stay near their relatives; however, some of them migrate. Knowing this could help with pest control efforts.
Rats are part of the urban ecosystem and an urban ecology approach to managing their populations may involve learning to share the city. Mert Guller/Unsplash

Living with rats involves understanding the city as an ecosystem

An ecosystems approach to cities that recognizes rats as part of the ecosystem can help address the challenges presented by urban rats.
Gene drives aim to deliberately spread bad genes when invasive species such as mice reproduce. Colin Robert Varndell/shutterstock.com

‘Gene drives’ could wipe out whole populations of pests in one fell swoop

Releasing just 100 mice carrying a faulty gene designed to stop them reproducing can remove an entire population of 50,000, a new study shows, paving the way for new eradication efforts.
Public park in Manhattan, home to a rat population with over 100 visible burrows. Dr. Michael H. Parsons

Scientist at work: Revealing the secret lives of urban rats

Rats foul our food, spread disease and damage property, but we know very little about them. A biologist explains how he tracks wild rats in New York City, and what he's learned about them so far.
Tractors may have revolutionised farming but to protect biosecurity, farmers could do with some extra help. Ben McLeod/Flickr

Go with the grain: technology to help farmers protect crops

New technology to tackle biosecurity challenges down the track is one of the five megatrends identified in today’s CSIRO report Australia’s Biosecurity Future: preparing for future biological challenges…

Bird biodiversity protects coffee yields

Coffee growers in Costa Rica have increased their coffee yields by leaving patches of surrounding rainforest untouched. Researchers…
Disease-carrying pests such as the biting midge Culicoides can be blown from Asia into northern Australia by strong winds. AJC1

The disease vectors, my friend, are blowing in the wind

Australian researchers are developing a new tool to help track and manage the vast numbers of disease-carrying insects blown…

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