Articles on Political polarization

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Days before their Oct. 28 presidential election, Brazilians protested news that supporters of right-wing front-runner Jair Bolsonaro had used WhatsApp to spread false information about his opponents. Reuters/Nacho Doce

WhatsApp skewed Brazilian election, proving social media’s danger to democracy

Facebook retired its 'Move fast and break things' slogan – perhaps because, as new research from Brazil confirms, democracy is among the things left broken by online misinformation and fake news.
There were 84 women in the U.S. House of Representatives in 2018 - and there are 106 in 2019. Office of Nancy Pelosi

How many women does it take to change a broken Congress?

Research shows that women work more collaboratively than men in groups and create more inclusive solutions to thorny problems. More women in Washington could bridge America's yawning partisan divide.
Demonstrators with cut-outs of congressional districts in front of the Supreme Court. Reuters/Joshua Roberts

4 reasons gerrymandering is getting worse

One of the main reasons polarization in the US is on the rise – the way congressional seats are drawn to favor parties – isn't going away anytime soon.
Judge Brett Kavanaugh is a polarizing figure — either partisan Republican or impartial jurist, depending on who you ask. AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Supreme Court polarization is not inevitable — just look at Europe

Controversial judicial appointments and divisive court rulings are not the norm everywhere. Here's what the US could learn from Europe about ensuring ideological balance on the Supreme Court.
The nation was bitterly divided over slavery in 1860, when this political cartoon was published. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

Lincoln’s ‘House Divided’ speech teaches important lessons about today’s political polarization

Lincoln's description of the Union as a house divided is well-remembered today. But many Americans fail to heed its lessons about equality and the moral foundations of popular government.
Florida gun owners marching with loaded firearms REUTERS/Chris Tilley

Want to understand gun owners? Watch their videos

Here's a challenge for gun control proponents: Watch 100 videos made by gun owners and gun rights advocates. One scholar watched these videos over five years and something surprising happened to her.
There are widespread fears that so-called echo chambers and filter bubbles are leading to political polarization that poses a danger to democracy. But are the fears unfounded? (Melvin Sokolsky/1963 via Creative Commons)

The myth of the echo chamber

Despite fears that so-called echo chambers are causing political polarization, a new study suggests it's not the case.

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