Articles on South America

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A supporter of former Bolivian president Evo Morales tells a police officer to respect the nation’s indigenous people, in La Paz, Bolivia, Nov. 12, 2019. AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko

Bolivia after Morales: An ‘ungovernable country’ with a power vacuum

Evo Morales is at least the ninth Bolivian president to by forced out of office by a mass uprising. But even in exile he remains by far the most popular politician in the country.
Chilean President Sebastián Piñera decrees a state of emergency to restore public order after a day of violent protest, Oct.19, 2019. Sebastián Rodríguez/Prensa Presidencia

Chile protests: President’s speeches early in crisis missed the mark, AI study reveals

As protests raged across Chile last month, President Piñera repeatedly addressed the nation. Researchers fed his speeches into an AI system to assess the emotions behind his words.
Supporters of former Bolivian president Evo Morales rally with indigenous flags outside the city of Cochabamba, Bolivia, Nov. 18, 2019. AP Photo/Juan Karita

Old religious tensions resurge in Bolivia after ouster of longtime indigenous president

Indigenous people, symbols and religious practices filled the halls of power in Bolivia during Evo Morales' 14-year tenure. Now a new conservative Christian leader seems to be erasing that legacy.
Demonstrators clash with a police water cannon during a recent anti-government protest in Santiago, Chile. Several South American countries have been experiencing massive social unrest in recent months. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)

What’s going on in South America? Understanding the wave of protests

In the last century, several South American countries faced coups, military dictatorships and social uprisings. Despite economic improvements in recent years, the continent remains mired in unrest.
Argentina’s president-elect, Alberto Fernández (right), with his running mate, former president and first lady Cristina Fernández de Kirchner. Reuters/Agustin Marcarian

Argentina elects new president on promises to fix economy and unify a struggling nation

Argentina has voted for change. Alberto Fernández, a 60-year-old lawyer, defeated President Mauricio Macri with a campaign emphasizing economic recovery, social inclusion and national unity.
More than 300,000 hectares of subtropical forest in Paraguay have burned since July due to illegal land clearing for agriculture, according to the National Security Ministry, Oct. 1, 2019. AP Photo/Jorge Saenz

In Paraguay, rural communities facing deforestation see power – and profit – in a beloved drink

Yerba mate is a wildly popular South American tea with a growing global market. Can this 'superfood' save Paraguay's tropical forests, too?
Many of Latin America’s leftist ‘revolutions’ are now in crisis. But the left is resurging in some countries. The Conversation / Photo Claudia Daut/Reuters

The Latin American left isn’t dead yet

Progressives are leading in the presidential elections of Argentina, Uruguay and Bolivia, bucking the region's recent rightward trend. But there are lessons in the failures of leftists past.
Venezuelans hoping to cross into Ecuador via Colombia amass at the Rumichaca border bridge in Tulcan, Ecuador, as new visa restrictions limiting migration took effect, Aug. 26, 2019. Reuters/Daniel Tapia

Latin America shuts out desperate Venezuelans but Colombia’s border remains open – for now

Citing national security, Ecuador, Peru and Chile have all made it harder for Venezuelan migrants to enter the country, and xenophobia is rising across the region – even in more welcoming Colombia.
The Paraguayan Chaco, South America’s second largest forest, is rapidly disappearing as agriculture extends deeper into what was once forest. Here, isolated stands of trees remain amid the farms. Joel E. Correia

South America’s second-largest forest is also burning – and ‘environmentally friendly’ charcoal is subsidizing its destruction

The cleared land of Paraguay's Chaco forest produces everyday products like charcoal and leather that are sold abroad to consumers who may never know the unsavory origins of their purchases.
Members of the Huni Kuin community survey the damage after a fire on August 22. Centro Huwã Karu Yuxibu via Facebook

Amazon in flames: Brazil’s Huni Kuin indigenous people count the social costs of fire and conflict

Huwã Karu Yuxibu, the cultural centre of the Huni Kuin indigenous group in the Amazonian state of Acre, was destroyed by fire in August.
FARC commander Iván Márquez issued a return to armed struggle in a video posted Aug. 29, 2019. Reuters TV (screengrab)

Colombia’s peace process under stress: 6 essential reads

Dissidents in Colombia's FARC guerrillas are threatening to renew armed struggle three years after signing a landmark peace deal. Here, experts explain the history of Colombia's fragile peace process.

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