Articles on urban wildlife

Displaying 21 - 33 of 33 articles

Much of the ‘smart cities’ rhetoric is dominated by the economic, with little reference to the natural world and its plight. Ase from www.shutterstock.com

Taking the city’s pulse: we need to link urban vitality back to the planet

The rhetoric of 'smart cities' is dominated by the economic, with little reference to the natural world and its plight. Truly smart and resilient cities need to be more in tune with the planet.
Doing its own thing: the eastern coyote, or coywolf, is a mix of coyote, wolf and dog which has spread across eastern North America. Jonathan Way, www.EasternCoyoteResearch.com

Why the eastern coyote should be a separate species: the ‘coywolf’

A wildlife biologist argues that the canid in eastern North America – known as the eastern coyote, or the coywolf by some – deserves to be classified as a separate species.
A park, in this case Hyde Park in Sydney, is one of the easiest and most accessible ways to engage with nature in the city. Lucy Taylor

Reducing stress at work is a walk in the park

Nature is dispersed through our cities, even if we don’t notice it. And there's abundant evidence that engaging with nature, even in urban settings, is good for us.
A puma and her two kittens look out over San Jose, California. Cchristopher Fust

How humans threaten pumas just by being nearby

Many Americans move to rural areas to live near nature. But the mere presence of humans changes wildlife behavior in ways that may have ripple effects.
As a generalist predator, spiders, like this Western Rough Wolf Spider, help limit the number of insects in your garden. Jean and Fred/Flickr

Spiders are a treasure trove of scientific wonder

Only two Australian spiders can kill you, but the rest are a pretty fascinating bunch.

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