Articles on US higher education

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In the movie ‘Goat,’ a fraternity puts pledges through gruesome and dangerous rituals. Killer Films

The wrongs of passage in fraternity hazing

With the fall term underway and an ongoing case over the death of a Penn State pledge in February, colleges are trying once again to figure out why hazing happens and what should be done to stop it.
How can we help the tens of thousands of college students who have been defrauded? SpeedKingz/Shutterstock.com

Why students need better protection from loan fraud

Students across the country have been defrauded by for-profit schools. Fine print in their enrollment contracts has stopped them from bringing their cases to court, but new rules could help.
Race-neutral affirmative action can help identify first-generation students like Blanca Diaz and LaQuintah Garrett. AP Photo/Amy Anthony

Colleges need affirmative action – but it can be expanded

Race-conscious admissions policies are still the best way to achieve diversity on campus. Yet, some race-neutral methods could help colleges improve diversity – and stand up to legal scrutiny.
Eleven states now have some sort of law permitting guns on college campuses. Lucio Eastman (Free State Project)

More states are allowing guns on college campuses

More and more states are passing legislation requiring that students and faculty be permitted to carry concealed weapons on campus. But shouldn't universities have a choice when it comes to campus safety?
Could legal intimidation threaten race-conscious admissions in the U.S.? AP Photo/Susan Walsh

The legal threat to diversity on campus

For colleges and universities that lack the multi-billion-dollar endowments of schools like Harvard, the mere threat of legal action may be enough to put an end to race-conscious admissions policies.
Three influential college presidents: Charles Eliot of Harvard (in office 1869-1909), Robert Maynard Hutchins of the University of Chicago (1929-45) and Drew Faust of Harvard (2007-18). AP Photo/Edward Kitch/Charles Krupa

Do college presidents still matter?

A former president of Northeastern and scholar of higher education shares his perspectives on what has – and hasn't – changed in the role of the college president.
Educafro, a Brazilian black activist movement, protested in 2012 to demand more affirmative action programs for higher education. AP Photo/Eraldo Peres

Affirmative action around the world

'Positive discrimination' policies around the world are on the rise. What might other countries teach the U.S. about attaining racial, economic and gender equality in higher education?
Though challenges like dyslexia can make learning difficult, these disabilities shouldn’t define who you are – or what you can do. Tim Kwee

Learning disabilities do not define us

The story of a six-year-old boy with dyslexia who, with support from friends and teachers, became a successful professor. Now he teaches teachers how to help children like him.
Drew Faust receives a hug from University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann during ceremonies installing her as the 28th president of Harvard University in 2007. Reuters/Michael Ivins

Drew Faust and old, white men: The changing role of university presidents

Most university presidents in the US are still white, male and over the age of 60. But as they retire, is there an opportunity to reshape college leadership and, with it, higher education itself?
Protestors at the University of California, Berkeley campus oppose the appearance of Breitbart News editor Milo Yiannopoulos. AP Photo/Ben Margot

Berkeley, Milo Yiannopoulos and the lessons of free speech

UC Berkeley had a duty to protect the free speech of right-wing provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos and those protesting his appearance. But what are the limits of free speech when it comes to campus safety?
Academics join public protests around the world against Donald Trump’s immigration ban. David Whinham/Newzulu

University vice chancellors say Trump order threatens global research

Academics worldwide are calling for the US president to reconsider the executive order on immigration, which many say is damaging to research collaboration.
How can students think critically about information in today’s age? UBC Library Communications/flickr

The challenge facing libraries in an era of fake news

Since the 19th century academic librarians have helped students navigate the complex world of information. In today's unpredictable information environment, how might they rethink their role?

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