Articles on Wildfire

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A wildfire rips through the forest near Fort McMurray on Highway 63 in May 2016. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)

How to fight wildfires and climate change with wetlands

As unlikely as it may sound, a new approach for fighting the destruction of wildfires in Canada’s boreal region may lie in wetlands packed with soaking layers of peat and topped with living moss.
Muddy water from debris flows like those in the Macalister catchment (West Gippsland, February 2007) can disrupt a region’s drinking water supply for years. Photo: Adrian Murphy (Melbourne Water)

Freak mud flows threaten our water supplies, and climate change is raising the risk

Australia's water supplies are at risk as climate extremes provoke erosion events that threaten lakes and dams.
About 100 homes in Angus, Ont. were damaged by a tornado in June 2014. Ten lost their roofs and had to be demolished. Gregory Alan Kopp, Western University

As climate changes, the way we build homes must change too

Weather-related catastrophic events have cost Canadians more than $17 billion in the past decade. That only stands to grow, unless building codes change to make homes more resilient.
Firefighters tackle a large blaze on Saddleworth Moor near Manchester, England, February 2019. West Yorkshire Fire Service

Are winter wildfires actually due to climate change?

Wildfires broke out across the British Isles during a recent heatwave. But the burning question of the link to climate change does not have an easy answer.
An image from the International Space Station captures plumes of smoke from California wildfires on August 4, 2018. NASA

Stories that made The Conversation unique in 2018

From the curious to the serious – a bird's eye view of the unique ways in which The Conversation covers the world.
A firefighter in California. Firefighting is getting more and more expensive as fires get more destructive. PETER DASILVA

The bitter lesson of the Californian fires

The California fires are just the most recent in a series of major wildfires. Together, they suggest we need to look at alternative ways of living with fire.
Black water cascaded down Cameron Falls in Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta after a 2018 wildfire denuded the landscape. (Kaleigh Watson)

Soot-filled rivers mark the need for a national wildfire strategy

Much of the country depends on water stored and filtered in forests. Fire-scarred watersheds highlight our need for a national wildfire strategy.
A firefighter runs while trying to save a home near Lakeport, Calif. on July 31, 2018. AP Photo/Noah Berger, File

Fighting historic wildfires amid bad ideas and no funding

Canada's boreal region faces bigger, hotter and more frequent wildfires that are increasingly unpredictable, but it lacks an investment in fire science that could help keep communities safe.

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