Articles on Youth vote

Displaying 1 - 20 of 31 articles

A demonstrator holds a sign outside the Portuguese parliament in Lisbon during a climate strike of school students as part of the Fridays for Future movements on Friday, May 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Armando Franca)

How youth influenced the EU election – and could do the same in Canada

It's clear that young voters are bringing critical issues to the fore as they did in the recent EU elections. Will they do so in Canada too?
Indian general elections begin April 11. vepar5/shutterstock

India election 2019: millions of Indian youth are underemployed and going to the polls

India election 2019: millions of Indian youth are underemployed and going to the polls. The Conversation, CC BY64.4 MB (download)
The world's largest democracy will see its biggest young voter turnout since gaining independence 72 years ago, with millions delivering their verdict on Narendra Modi's BJP government.
Canadians are still forced to travel to polling stations and line up to vote. Online voting would save time and money. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Here’s how we can get more people to vote in elections

About one-third of Canadians don't bother to vote in federal elections. Many people cite "everyday life issues," like the time it takes to vote, as reasons why they don't participate.
The default position in social and political theory is to disregard children altogether, or to consider them as learner-citizens. AAP/Lucy Hughes Jones

Giving voice to the young: survey shows people want under-18s involved in politics

When children and young people have opportunities for active citizenship, they demonstrate a wide range of ways of contributing to their communities.
Studies have shown that young people do not consider politicians and political parties to be representative of issues that impact them. AAP/Lukas Coch

Many young people aren’t enrolled to vote – but are we asking them the wrong question?

Concern about youth electoral enrolment is framed the wrong way. It usually suggests that young people are somehow deficient and that they – and not the political culture – are the problem.

Top contributors

More