Artículos sobre Mass shootings

Mostrando 1 - 20 de 85 artículos

Kevin Vickers, former House of Commons Sergeant-at-Arms, receives the Star of Courage at Rideau Hall from Gov. Gen. David Johnston in February 2016 to pay tribute to security services members who responded to the 2014 shooting on Parliament Hill. Vickers was lauded as a hero. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

When we call survivors ‘heroes,’ we’re missing the full picture

We do a disservice to survivors of major tragedies when we call them "heroes." Instead, we should change our policies and attitudes to help them truly survive the disaster.
Drills can help people learn how to respond when an active shooter situation arises, as recently occurred in Santa Clarita, Calif. AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

Do lockdown drills do any good?

Being ready takes training and practice. But it might not require fake blood and simulated shootings.
Can online posts help scholars – or police – tell the difference between people who are just ranting and those who plan real violence? Aggapom Poomitud/Shutterstock.com

Analyzing online posts could help spot future mass shooters and terrorists

Researchers look for signals that might distinguish people who are upset and ranting online from those who intend to do real physical harm.
A big discrepancy exists between the actual threat of mass shootings and the way the public perceives that threat. Tatiana Akhmetgalieva/Shutterstock.com

Have we become too paranoid about mass shootings?

You're just as likely to be a victim of a mass shooting as you are to be struck by lightning. So why do nearly 50% of Americans say they're afraid of being caught in the crossfire?
Marjory Stoneman Douglas students gather in the Florida state Capitol in Tallahassee Feb. 21, 2018 to confront legislators about stricter gun laws. Gerald Herbert/AP Photo

More mental health care won’t stop the gun epidemic, new study suggests

A new study looks at whether deaths by suicide could be lowered with mental health care. To a small degree, yes. But a look at the costs suggests there may be better ways to prevent shooting deaths.
Pres. Trump speaking on Aug. 5, 2019 about the mass shootings in El Paso, Tex. and Dayton, Ohio. Evan Vucci/AP Photo

Guns and mental illness: A psychiatrist explains the complexities

President Trump called for better identification of people with mental illness as a way to stop gun violence and mass shootings. A psychiatrist offers his take on the president's stance.
The research doesn’t say what some lawmakers suggest every time there’s a mass shooting. Fredrick Tendong/Unsplash

Stop blaming video games for mass killings

On the whole, results from psychology research studies don't support a direct connection between playing violent video games and aggressive behavior.
Police secure the main entrance to UNC Charlotte after a shooting at the school that left at least two people dead, Tuesday, April 30. Jason E. Miczek/AP

University of North Carolina at Charlotte shooting has these things in common with other campus shootings

The April 30 shooting at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte isn't an outlier. Research shows it fits a familiar pattern of campus shootings in terms of time and place.
Mourners carry the body of a victim of the New Zealand mosque shootings for a burial in Christchurch on March 20, 2019. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)

The hypocritical media coverage of the New Zealand terror attacks

As the news of the shootings in New Zealand quickly unfolded, a researcher took note of the way the event was covered in news media and how the coverage was being discussed on social media.
School shooters tend to have a death wish, new research shows. Constantine Pankin from www.shutterstock.com

School shooters usually show these signs of distress long before they open fire, our database shows

School shooters typically show warning signs long before they become killers, but educators are sometimes ill-equipped to act on what they see, two researchers who are analyzing mass shooters say.
Candlelight vigil at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Florida. AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

US gun violence in 2018: 3 essential reads

Scholars helped put a persistent problem into a larger context with their research.
Officials guide students off a bus and into a recreation center where they were reunited with their parents after a shooting at a suburban Denver middle school Tuesday, May 7, 2019, in Highlands Ranch, Colo. David Zalubowski/AP Photo

What mass shootings do to those not shot: Social consequences of mass gun violence

Mass shootings bring terror in ways that people watching from afar can only imagine. And yet, society at large is also affected, a trauma psychiatrist writes.
Prayers outside the Tree of Life synagogue. Reuters/Cathal McNaughton

How safe is your place of worship?

A national survey of over 1,300 congregations found that religious leaders struggle to balance security concerns with carrying out a mission to be open to the communities they serve.
Vigil held in the Squirrel Hill section of Pittsburgh for shooting victims, Oct. 27, 2018. AP/Gene J. Puskar

Pittsburgh’s lesson: Hatred does not emerge in a vacuum

Mass murders like the killings at a Pittsburgh synagogue are seen as the work of disturbed individuals. But America has allowed violence to become unexceptional, ignoring its root cause.
Evacuees arrive at the UNLV Thomas & Mack Center after a gunman opened fire Oct. 1, 2017 in Las Vegas. Al Powers/AP

We provided psychological first aid after the Las Vegas shooting – here’s what we learned

One year after the Oct. 1 shooting massacre in Las Vegas, a team of scholars from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas offers insights into how to best help those affected by the violence.

Principales colaboradores

Más