Artículos sobre Rio Olympics 2016

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Urban planning was once an Olympic event, although the first gold medal – awarded to Germany’s Alfred Hensel for the Nuremberg stadium – turned out to be an unfortunate choice.

‘No More Hunger’ Games: if only we cared about the real-world Liveability Olympics

Imagine cities competed to eliminate hunger, poverty, unemployment, crime and greenhouse emissions, and to offer housing and transport for all. Don't scoff – urban planning was once an Olympic event.
The 100m final in Rio will be won in a time that would have seemed impossible to the athletes competing in Athens in 1896.

Higher, faster, stronger: Olympic athletics by numbers

As the track and field events are about to start in Rio, we look at how some athletic events have changed since the first Olympics in 1896.
Olympic authorities were quick to deny that the green pool posed a risk to divers’ health, but that actually depends on why the water changed colour. Reuters/Antonio Bronic

Going for … green? Why Rio’s swimming pools are changing colour

The possible culprits are: a sudden algae bloom; a change in pool alkalinity; or a chemical reaction in the water. How do these cause a change in the colour of the water?
Athletes must execute their individualised race plan to the best of their ability to win. Reuters/Michael Dalder

Explainer: what makes a winning swimmer?

Races at the international level are often decided by as little as 0.01 of a second.
Protesters wearing masks of Russia’s President Vladimir Putin take part in a demonstration against the country’s ‘anti-gay’ laws outside the Embassy of the Russian Federation in London, February 2014. Reuters/Neil Hall

Homosexuality and the Olympic movement: towards better Games

Sport remains “one of the last bastions of cultural and institutional homophobia” in Western societies. But there is progress.
Bolting past the finish line. ave Thompson / PA Archive/Press Association Images

How to find your best running style

In order to become a better runner, you need to consider these factors first.
Jim Thorpe and Ben Johnson were both banned from the Olympics. But if each had played at different points in history, they would have been allowed to compete. Nick Lehr/The Conversation

When doping wasn’t considered cheating

In sports, what's considered fair play has changed throughout history. At one point, even looking 'too poor' was grounds for exclusion.
Will the Winning Edge strategy impact sport participation and limit sports’ abilities to develop Olympic champions? reuters photographer/reuters

Are the Rio 2016 Games a true measure of Australia’s Winning Edge?

Australia has had a good start to the Rio Olympics. But does that mean that the strategy created in response to Australia's poor Olympic performance in 2012 is working?
A TV cameraman shoots a Madame Tussauds Museum figure of US Olympic gold medal swimmer Michael Phelps at Banneker Pool in Washington, to coincide with the opening of the Rio Olympics on August 5. Gary Cameron/Reuters

Business Briefing: the big bucks of broadcasting the Olympics

Business Briefing: the big bucks of broadcasting the Olympics. The Conversation20 MB (download)
The amount broadcasters will pay for the rights to the Olympics keeps going up, but is the value of the rights changing?
Gold medal winner Mack Horton (centre) said he had no time or respect for drug cheats in reference to silver medallist Sun Yang. Dominic Ebenbichler/Reuters

Horton wins by naming the elephant in the room at Rio Olympics

Rarely do we see such unscripted individual honesty on difficult topics such as doping, right in the middle of arguably the biggest international sporting stage.
Rugby Sevens serves as the perfect example of how lifelong dedication to a single sport might not be the only pathway to Olympic success. Ahmed Jadallah/Reuters

Why talent transfer is key for a winning rugby Sevens team

The gold medal-winning Australian women's rugby Sevens team is a shining example of talent transfer from other sports.
Once the pageantry is over, many Olympic athletes have to return to normal life – which means figuring out how to make a living. Tony Gentile/Reuters

How do Olympic athletes pay the electric bill?

A former Olympic gold medalist reflects on his own financial struggles as he trained and competed for the 1984 Games. Decades later, not much has changed for many Olympians.
Athletes seek to gain competitive advantages in lots of different ways and many of these are not banned. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Why is doping wrong anyway?

Doping simply gives athletes an advantage that can be compared to other forms of training regimes. So why the moral outrage?

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