Artículos sobre Sustainable development

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The declaration of the 5 million-hectare Katiti Petermann Indigenous Protected Area around Uluru in 2015 helped take the land area of northern Australia in the hands of traditional owners to around 60%. Central Land Council/AAP

Remote Indigenous Australia’s ecological economies give us something to build on

Expanding on sustainable practices in remote parts of Australia can deliver great benefits to both local Indigenous owners and national and global communities.
More than 300,000 hectares of subtropical forest in Paraguay have burned since July due to illegal land clearing for agriculture, according to the National Security Ministry, Oct. 1, 2019. AP Photo/Jorge Saenz

In Paraguay, rural communities facing deforestation see power – and profit – in a beloved drink

Yerba mate is a wildly popular South American tea with a growing global market. Can this 'superfood' save Paraguay's tropical forests, too?
Indonesia announced ‘war against marine plastic debris’ in 2016 as a recent study dubbed the country as the second largest waste producer in the world. www.shutterstock.com

Indonesia needs more research on how plastic waste in the ocean impact marine life. Here’s why

Indonesia is struggling to keep its waste from the oceans. The government has announced ambitious plan to curb plastic waste. However, lack of research to support the policy.
Indigenous Marind in West Papua consider the forest and its plants and animals as kin. These culturally valued multispecies relations, however, are being disrupted by oil palm development projects. Sophie Chao

In West Papua, oil palm expansion undermines the relations of indigenous Marind people to forest plants and animals

Indigenous Marind in West Papua consider the forest and its plants and animals as kin. These culturally valued multispecies relations, however, are being disrupted by oil palm development projects.
Palm oil development is not just about the economy but also needs to consider social and environmental costs. www.shutterstock.com

The human cost of palm oil development

There are studies showing that farmers can have economic benefits from palm oil. However, they can also be impoverished by the commodity.
The Bangladesh government wants Karail, an established community of 200,000 people in the capital Dhaka, to make way for development. Laura Elizabeth Pohl/Bread for the World/flickr

What sort of ‘development’ has no place for a billion slum dwellers?

A community of 200,000 in Dhaka faces eviction to make room for "development". Is it time to rethink the concept, especially with a billion people now living in informal settlements worldwide?
More by luck than design, recent recent levels of immigration seem to be in a ‘goldilocks zone’ that balances economic, social and environmental objectives. www.shutterstock.com

If you think less immigration will solve Australia’s problems, you’re wrong; but neither will more

Immigration is neither the problem nor solution in many areas where Australia is off-track, from government debt to environmental action.
Indonesia plans to relocate its capital from the sprawling city of Jakarta – and it isn’t the only country with plans to build whole new cities. AsiaTravel/Shutterstock

Indonesia isn’t the only country planning new cities. Why not Australia?

Other countries are planning new cities using technological innovation to achieve more sustainable development. Such plans aren't new for Australia, but existing city growth is the focus of attention.
Australia’s ambassador to the United Nations, Gillian Bird, makes a statement at the 2016 Habitat III conference, where the New Urban Agenda was adopted. Alexei Trundle

This is why health has to be at the heart of the New Urban Agenda

Australia and other United Nations member states signed up to the New Urban Agenda more than a year ago. But how well is health being integrated into sustainable urban development?
A worker inspects solar panels at a solar farm in China. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Developing countries can prosper without increasing emissions

What do China, India, South Africa and Mexico have in common? They all reduced the carbon intensity of their economies without sacrificing economic growth. Other developing nations can do the same.

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