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Extreme weather could wipe out insects

Increased bouts of extreme weather in the future will lead to mass extinctions of insects and reptiles, a new study shows.

Researchers determined the temperatures at which ten Australian fruit fly species could develop and reproduce, and their limits of tolerance for hot and cold temperatures.

Cold-blooded species, or ectotherms, rely on the environment to regulate their body temperature and will be more susceptible to the impact of climate change. The results show species distribution is shaped by tolerance of unusually warm or cold days and even short term weather events can pose a threat to population numbers.

Read more at University of Melbourne

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7 Comments sorted by

  1. Dave Bradley

    logged in via email @yahoo.com.au

    This is the way the world ends
    This is the way the world ends
    This is the way the world ends
    Not with a bang but a whimper.

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  2. Jay Wulf

    Digerati at nomeonastiq.com

    I came here to be entertained by all the climate deniers.

    But there is nary a post, maybe bugs and reptiles don't impact the bottom line of the large carbon polutters in the short term so they have not directed the PR sock puppets in here.

    I iz dissapoint!

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    1. Gary Luke
      Gary Luke is a Friend of The Conversation.

      thoroughly disgusted

      In reply to Jay Wulf

      It's a prediction. To check its veracity lets revisit this in ten, twenty and thirty years. Lets not get bogged down in disputes about whether related predictions in the past actually occurred or not or whether the correct formulas and numbers were input into the computer.

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    2. Jay Wulf

      Digerati at nomeonastiq.com

      In reply to Gary Luke

      I like this approach. It allows us to do nothing at all while the increased revenues on investment for shareholders continue. All the time socilalising the losses and privitising the profits by kicking the cost of cleanup and mitigation down the road.

      By then, the major culprits will be old and senile and won't care. 'Old mans bet'.

      Brilliant strategy.

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    3. Gary Luke
      Gary Luke is a Friend of The Conversation.

      thoroughly disgusted

      In reply to Jay Wulf

      Nobody said to do nothing. Whether anythong is done or not, revisit it in a decade or more to see whether the predictions are correct instead of the interminable arguments about numbers. Are you one of those strange people who believes that anyone who doesn't completely fall in line with your own preferences must be some sort of disagreeable ratbag?

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    4. Jay Wulf

      Digerati at nomeonastiq.com

      In reply to Gary Luke

      One word: "Hindcasting" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindcast)

      >"Are you one of those strange people who believes that anyone who doesn't completely fall in line with your own preferences must be some sort of disagreeable ratbag?"

      Are you one of those strange people who believes that anyone who doesn't do any basic reading before forming a strong opinion should be taken as seriously in a 'debate' as those who have?

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    5. Rotha Jago

      concerned citizen

      In reply to Jay Wulf

      Climate, surely is not the sole determinant in survival.
      We have seen sudden changes in the insect populations here in tropical north of coastal Queensland.
      While persistent rain brings many insects, there is also a merciful reduction in Glyphosate spraying by the Local Council. Could that be a factor?

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