Articles sur African universities

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 48 articles

Students in South Africa are tired of Western, Eurocentric university curricula. Reuters/Mike Hutchings

Decolonisation: academics must change what they teach, and how

More than two decades after apartheid ended, South African universities still tend to offer a view of the country and continent that is rooted in colonial and apartheid thinking.
As degrees become more commonplace, African graduates are struggling more to find jobs. George Esiri/Reuters

If Africa grows its universities cleverly, its economies will flourish

Global economic realities shouldn't deter African universities from continuing to push for massification. But they must do so armed with knowledge, lessons from elsewhere and strong funding models.
When online and offline learning experiences meet, magic can happen. Shutterstock

How online courses can bring the world into Africa’s classrooms

MOOCs are an opportunity for African universities to bring the continent's thinkers and theories to the world. They also have great benefits for full-time students to experience a flipped classroom.
Of course Africa’s universities need collaboration – but not if it’s merely an imposition of ideas from elsewhere. Shutterstock

Global academic collaboration: a new form of colonisation?

Africa's universities must avoid collaborative programmes with the North that become mere tick-box exercises that only benefit Northern researchers and organisations.
Students cheer as a statue of Cecil John Rhodes is removed from the University of Cape Town in April 2015. REUTERS/Sumaya Hisham

Decolonising the curriculum: it’s time for a strategy

There is a risk that because of fatigue, frustration and silencing the important moment created by South Africa's student movements will pass by with no proper, long-term structural change.
Students want colonial symbols, such as this statue of Cecil John Rhodes, gone from their universities. EPA/Nic Bothma

Decolonising universities isn’t an easy process – but it has to happen

Calls for the decolonisation of countries, institutions, the mind and of knowledge are not new. In South Africa, these changes are crucial and long overdue. But they must be carefully thought through.
When politics interferes in universities – overtly or discreetly – it makes higher education less autonomous. Thomas Mukoya/Reuters

How political interference keeps hurting Africa’s universities

Africa's universities supposedly became more independent after the early 1990s. But it appears they haven't achieved much more than cosmetic autonomy from political interference.
Small classes like these are sadly uncommon in Kenya’s often overcrowded, oversubscribed universities. Thomas Mukoya/Reuters

Kenya’s universities are in the grip of a quality crisis

Kenya's authorities are trying to deal with declining standards at the country's public and private universities. This will require a strengthened regulatory framework and hard work from institutions.

Les contributeurs les plus fréquents

Plus