Articles sur Anzac Day

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Yassmin Abdel-Magied has ‘apologised profusely to [Julie Bishop] and the Australian government’ for a controversial Facebook post. http://www.yassminam.com

Julie Bishop keeps Abdel-Magied on Australian-Arab board

Julie Bishop has refused to sack Yassmin Abdel-Magied from the board of the Council for Australian-Arab Relations, resisting pressure from some in government ranks.
It is important to remember Yassmin Abdel-Magied’s comment was not made when she was actually presenting on the ABC. http://www.yassminam.com/

Abdel-Magied Anzac row is a storm over not much

There are two issues in the latest episode of the culture wars, sparked by the Anzac Day Facebook comment by controversial young Muslim activist and part-time ABC presenter Yassmin Abdel-Magied. One is…
A rainbow wreath laid by defence forces at a contemporary Anzac Day service. Daniel Spellman/Defence Gay and Lesbian Information Service

Witch-hunts and surveillance: the hidden lives of queer people in the military

Until 1992, being a gay or lesbian soldier was illegal in Australia. New research is unearthing the heartbreaking stories of people who devoted their life to the military but were discharged when their sexuality was exposed.
Part of a black cotton cushion cover depicting the Australian coat of arms embroidered by Lance Corporal Alfred Briggs (Albert Biggs), 20 Battalion, AIF. Courtesy of Australian War Memorial

Stitching lives back together: men’s rehabilitation embroidery in WWI

Embroidery - often seen as women's work - was a common form of therapy for troops wounded in the first world war. One soldier, Albert Biggs, learned to sew with his left hand after his right arm was badly injured.
The Qingming Festival, also known as Tomb-Sweeping Day, is marked by Chinese people by going to the cemetery to clean up tombs, bring flowers, and make offerings to their ancestors. Jerome Favre/AAP

Why China will be watching how we commemorate Anzac Day

Like Australia, China traditionally commemorates those who served in war in April each year, and increasingly they do it via social media.
Queen Elizabeth II meets with Australian Defence Force personnel and veterans at the Australian War Memorial in 2011. Graham Tidy/AAP

Friday essay: King, Queen and country – will Anzac thwart republicanism?

As Australians once found spiritual communion through allegiance to the British monarch, they find similar virtues in Anzac today. Can the republican movement connect with a large enough number of people in a similar way?
Do the holes in the banner carried by these Vietnam veterans during an Anzac Day parade in Canberra make any difference? AAP Image/Alan Porritt

Do wind vent holes in banners make a difference? We used a wind tunnel to find out

Attend any ANZAC Day parade and you might see people carrying banners with holes cut in them. They're supposed to cut any drag or wind resistance but do they do any good?
The Yininmadyemi sculpture in Hyde Park celebrates Indigenous and Torres Strait Island service men and women. On Anzac Day, who are we honouring? Mick Tsikas/AAP

In remembering Anzac Day, what do we forget?

Anzac Day is a big part of our national story. But the politics of memory mean the parts of this story that don't fit neatly into the Anzac narrative are too often forgotten.
Reporter Scott McIntyre lost his job with SBS following several controversial tweets on Anzac Day – but does the Fair Work Act protect the right to political expression? Dave Hunt/AAP

Scott McIntyre vs SBS will test employees’ right to be opinionated

Scott McIntyre's legal challenge against being sacked by SBS will be an interesting test of whether the Fair Work Act offers any safe haven for employees to maintain a personal and political identity.
Australian newspaper photographers have always been forbidden to show military failure or fragility. AAP Image/Dave Hunt

We censor war photography in Australia – more’s the pity

Although more than 100,000 Australians have lost their lives as a result of war service, photographs of our dead have never been published in newspapers.Perhaps we should reconsider this.
Australian Navy, Army and Air Force personnel marched in record numbers at the 2015 Mardi Gras, led by senior Defence officers – a stark contrast to the way gay veterans were treated in the past. Department of Defence

Laying wreaths for Australians who once served in silence

On Anzac Day 1982, five gay veterans tried to lay a wreath at Melbourne’s Shrine of Remembrance, but were turned away by the Shrine Guard and the state RSL president. This year, that won't happen.

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