Articles sur Colour blindness

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Australian bowler Mitchell Marsh receives the pink ball during the Test match between Australia and New Zealand at the Adelaide Oval. AAP Image/Dave Hunt

We need to ditch the pink ball in day-night test cricket

The pink ball introduced to this year's day night cricket test can be difficult to see for some players, especially if they are colour blind. There is a better choice of colour.
Australian surfer Mick Fanning, seen here surfing at Snapper Rocks on the Gold Coast, has decided to change the colour of his surfboard. No more yellow. AAP Image/Jesse Little

Mick Fanning changes his surfboard colour from ‘yum yum yellow’

The recent shark attack was enough to convince Australian surfer Mick Fanning that the colour of his surfboard may have been a factor. But what do sharks actually see in the water?
New research could help prevent negative encounters between “us” and “them”. Richard Ling

Red alert in the deep blue: sharks are probably colour-blind

We’ve known since early last year that sharks are most likely colour-blind. But today, in a paper published in Biology Letters by our team at UWA, we explain why this is the case. It’s a finding we believe…
This is how a person without colour blindness would see these coloured test tubes. Bigstockphoto / Craig Colvin

Explainer: what is colour blindness?

Here are six test tubes filled with coloured dyes. How many different colours do you see? Most people say six, but some people would say only two or three. There are even some (very rare) people who see…

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