Articles sur Constitutional Court

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Deputy chief justice Dikgang Moseneke, left, and. chief justice Mogoeng Mogoeng at a special session to mark Moseneke’s retirement. GCIS

South Africa marks the end of a remarkable judicial career

The retirement of Dikgang Moseneke, one of South Africa's eminent judges and the Constitutional Court's deputy chief justice, is a moment to reflect on the court's place in society and his legacy.
South African President Jacob Zuma, flanked by ANC Secretary-General Gwede Mantashe (left) and Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa. Reuters/Mike Hutchings

South Africa’s politicians will have to adjust to many more coalitions

A key question ahead of local government elections in South Africa is whether the African National Congress will retain control of seven of the country's eight metropolitan municipalities.
Gwede Mantashe, general secretary of South Africa’s governing party the African National Congress, holds the key to Jacob Zuma’s future. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Dramatic night in South Africa leaves president hanging on by a thread

For the time being at least, South African President Jacob Zuma is not ready to relinquish power. But perhaps sooner rather than later he may have to face the inevitable.
South Africa’s Constitutional Court has ruled that President Jacob Zuma failed in his duty to ‘uphold, defend and respect’ the Constitution. GCIS

Zuma court ruling: South Africans witness a massive day for democracy

The Constitutional Court judgment in the opposition's case against President Jacob Zuma represents the exercise of judicial authority and expertise at the highest level by international standards.
Kenya’s Supreme Court judges file into the chamber during the opening of parliament. Reuters/Noor Khamis

How Commonwealth countries have forged a new way to appoint judges

The electorate and those involved in public governance should focus more on how judges are appointed. This is because they need to make sure that individuals of the highest quality get the job.
President Jacob Zuma surprised South Africans by offering to pay back public money spent on his private home. Reuters/Nic Bothma

Zuma’s about-turn suggests South Africa faces another unhinged political year

Jacob Zuma has backtracked on two major decisions in under two months – first after he fired his finance minister; now he says he’ll pay back public money spent on his lavish Nkandla homestead.
South Africa is taking a tough stance against the practice of abducting and forcing young girls into marriage that’s still rife in some parts of the country. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Banning child and forced marriages is gaining traction in Africa

The reasons for the phenomenon of child marriage are complex and include the fact that in customary law, marriageable age was never reckoned as an actual number but depended on puberty.
Students at Stellenbosch University call for Afrikaans to be scrapped as the institution’s main language. Reuters/Mike Hutchings

Why Afrikaans doesn’t qualify for special treatment at universities

Those who don't want Stellenbosch University to make English the main language of instruction have invoked South Africa's Constitution - but the assumptions underlying their arguments are false.
A judgment by South Africa’s Constitutional Court unambiguously set out South Africa’s legal obligations. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Al-Bashir: what the law says about South Africa’s duties

The South African government’s failure to arrest Omar al-Bashir flies in the face of the Constitutional Court’s decision in 2014 that South Africa has a duty to abide by its international obligations.

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