Articles sur Criminal law

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Pages from Robert Mueller’s final report on the special counsel investigation into Donald Trump, which show heavy redaction by the Department of Justice. AP Photo/Jon Elswick

Did Trump obstruct justice? 5 questions Congress must answer

Mueller's report describes more than a dozen times Trump may have broken the law. Here's how Congress will decide whether the president obstructed justice during federal probes into his presidency.
Special counsel Robert Mueller reached no definitive conclusion about whether President Donald Trump obstructed justice in firing FBI Director James Comey or attacking his own investigation. Reuters/Hyungwon Kang, AP Photo/Susan Walsh, Reuters/Jonathan Ernst, Twitter

Trump and obstruction of justice: An explainer

Legally, a person can obstruct justice even if he committed no other crime – though it is harder to prove. It all depends on the intent behind pressuring investigators, say, or firing an FBI director.
Coercive control is a form of domestic violence based on a subtle but persistent form of emotional and psychological abuse. from shutterstock.com

Why Sally Challen’s appeal is not a win for women victims of coercive control

Advocates say the recent quashing of Sally Challen's murder conviction brought attention to a hidden feature of domestic violence. But it may have also painted Challen as an unstable woman.
At the Victorian Liberal Party election campaign launch, Opposition leader Matthew Guy said Labor had presided over a law and order crisis. AAP Image/James Ross

FactCheck: does Victoria have Australia’s highest rate of crime?

Victorian Opposition leader Matthew Guy said under Premier Daniel Andrews, 'Victoria has won the unenviable title as the state with the country’s highest rate of crime'. Is that right?
Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Attorney-General Christian Porter announced that sabotaging food will now attract a penalty of up to 15 years’ imprisonment. AAP/Lukas Coch

Why the increased penalties for strawberry sabotage will do little to prevent the crime

After a spate of sewing needles being found in strawberries, the federal government has moved quickly to tighten penalties for those who sabotage fruit. But it is unlikely to be a strong deterrent.
Gerald Stanley enters the courthouse in Battleford, Sask., in February 2018 during his trial in the death of Colten Boushie, an Indigenous man. The use by Stanley’s defence team of peremptory challenges produced an all-white jury in his trial. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Liam Richards

A good first step towards diverse, impartial Canadian juries

The Canadian government's criminal justice bill would abolish what are known as peremptory challenges. Here's why that's long overdue.

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