Articles sur Drug development

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Scientists are now using evolution to create designer proteins for therapies and industrial processes. Johan Jarnestad / The Royal Academy of Sciences

2018 Nobel Prize for chemistry goes to scientists who learned to ‘hack’ evolution in the lab

Nature doesn't always make the things we need so three Nobel Prize winners figured out how to fast-track evolution in the lab to create medicines, biofuels and industrial chemicals for modern life.
A drug needs to pass quite a few hurdles before it gets to the market. The Conversation/Wes Mountain

Explainer: how do drugs get from the point of discovery to the pharmacy shelf?

Only around 10% of new drugs in development make it onto the market. A drug needs to go through animal trials, and then four phases of human trials to be deemed suitable for use in patients.
Randomisation is the only commonly accepted method of ensuring an unbiased estimate of the treatment effect. The Conversation/Wes Mountain

Randomised control trials: what makes them the gold standard in medical research?

A randomised controlled trial is the best way to compare a new treatment with the standard treatment. And randomising trial participants is a core feature of the experiment.
3D bioprinted channel, representing a blood vessel within a hydrogel that mimics human tissue. Forget, Heiny, Derme, Mitterberger, Shastri

The next pharmaceutical revolution could be 3D bioprinted

3D bioprinting of living cells and materials may contribute to faster and cheaper ways to create effective new drugs - and even reduce animal testing.
Melbourne thalidomider Lyn Rowe (right) won her legal case for compensation in 2012, at age 50. Supplied by the Rowe Family/AAP

Could thalidomide happen again?

Thalidomide caused thousands of spontaneous abortions and left more than 10,000 children severely disabled. What guarantee is there that the same thing can’t occur again today?

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