Articles sur Extinction

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Beach closed to protect threatened bird species, Chincoteague, Virginia. brownpau/Flickr

Protecting endangered species: 6 essential reads

Congress is considering proposals to amend the Endangered Species Act. In this roundup we offer views on what's lost when species disappear and the complexities of bringing them back from the brink.
A feral dog chasing a wild boar, Banni grasslands, India. Chetan Misher/Facebook

The bark side: domestic dogs threaten endangered species worldwide

Cats have a bad reputation as wildlife killers (deservedly so). But dogs aren't off the hook: new research shows domestic dogs have contributed to the extinction of at least 11 species.
What it could have looked like when humans and megafauna lived together: a giant macropod Procoptodon goliah in the foreground, while Thylacinus cynocephalus hunts for prey nearby. A herd of Zygomaturus can be see on the lake edge of the ancient Willandra system. Illustration by Laurie Beirne

Aboriginal Australians co-existed with the megafauna for at least 17,000 years

The extinction of the giant reptiles, marsupials and birds that once called Australia home has been the subject of much debate, including the role early Australians may have had on their fate.
Giraffes’ future is much less secure than many people had imagined. Craig Fraser/Shutterstock

It’s time to stand tall for imperilled giraffes

Are giraffes really facing extinction? The decline of these beloved animals - and many others – has been hidden in plain sight as Africa builds ever more roads, railways and cities.
The grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus): at 60 grams, nearly the smallest primate in the world. I studied this primate in Madagascar. Jason Gilchrist, www.jasongilchrist.co.uk

Dawn of ‘Trumpocene’ era spells disaster for world’s primates

As Donald Trump prepares to enter the White House, there may be dark days ahead for some of the world's rarest and most beautiful primates.
The Bramble Cay Melomys is arguably the first mammal driven extinct by climate change, rather than direct human interaction. Ian Bell/EHP/State of Queensland

We can’t save all wildlife, so conservation laws need to change

Australia’s conservation laws presume that we can preserve everything in its natural state. But in a changing world, we'll have to be more flexible than that.
How many species of frog are in the picture? Genetics often says ‘more than we thought’. Michael Lee (Flinders University & South Australian Museum)

The Earth’s biodiversity could be much greater than we thought

The Earth is full of many varied species from the largest mammals to the tiniest organisms. But we now think there could be ten times more species than was originally thought.

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