Articles sur Extinction

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This Auroch skeleton from Denmark dates to around 7,500BC. The circles indicate where the animal was wounded by arrows. Malene Thyssen./Wikimedia

The quest to revive extinct Aurochs to restore ancient lands

Bringing back aurochs is a competitive and ambitious venture aiming at recreating wilderness in Europe. But ethical and scientific questions linger.
On the prowl in the outback. Hugh McGregor/Arid Recovery

For whom the bell tolls: cats kill more than a million Australian birds every day

For the first time, researchers have estimated the toll taken by feral and pet cats on Australia's bird life - and the numbers are high enough to push several species towards extinction.
If frogs can glow in the dark and cockroaches can change history, why couldn’t dog-birds exist? Chris Goldberg / flickr

Global series: Wild world

A collection of The Conversation Global's best articles on animals, from glow-in-the-dark frogs to the wood beetles that do humanity's dirty work.
Nearly one-third of tropical animal species face extinction if humans do not curb our growing appetites for beef, pork and other land-intensive meats. The Panamanian golden frog bred by the Vancouver Aquarium in this 2014 file photo may be extinct in its natural habitat. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

How changing your diet could save animals from extinction

As much as one-third of animal species in the tropics could be eradicated if their habitats continue to be converted for monoculture farming. We can all do something to make a difference.
Hypothetical reconstruction of the largest extinct megapode, Progura gallinacea (right), with a modern Brush-turkey and a Grey Kangaroo. Artwork by E. Shute, from photos by Tony Rudd, Kim Benson and Aaron Camens

Tall turkeys and nuggety chickens: large ‘megapode’ birds once lived across Australia

Large birds once lived across Australia, only to become extinct around the time that giant marsupials and other megafauna died out during the Pleistocene "ice ages".
Beach closed to protect threatened bird species, Chincoteague, Virginia. brownpau/Flickr

Protecting endangered species: 6 essential reads

Congress is considering proposals to amend the Endangered Species Act. In this roundup we offer views on what's lost when species disappear and the complexities of bringing them back from the brink.
A feral dog chasing a wild boar, Banni grasslands, India. Chetan Misher/Facebook

The bark side: domestic dogs threaten endangered species worldwide

Cats have a bad reputation as wildlife killers (deservedly so). But dogs aren't off the hook: new research shows domestic dogs have contributed to the extinction of at least 11 species.
What it could have looked like when humans and megafauna lived together: a giant macropod Procoptodon goliah in the foreground, while Thylacinus cynocephalus hunts for prey nearby. A herd of Zygomaturus can be see on the lake edge of the ancient Willandra system. Illustration by Laurie Beirne

Aboriginal Australians co-existed with the megafauna for at least 17,000 years

The extinction of the giant reptiles, marsupials and birds that once called Australia home has been the subject of much debate, including the role early Australians may have had on their fate.
Giraffes’ future is much less secure than many people had imagined. Craig Fraser/Shutterstock

It’s time to stand tall for imperilled giraffes

Are giraffes really facing extinction? The decline of these beloved animals - and many others – has been hidden in plain sight as Africa builds ever more roads, railways and cities.
The grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus): at 60 grams, nearly the smallest primate in the world. I studied this primate in Madagascar. Jason Gilchrist, www.jasongilchrist.co.uk

Dawn of ‘Trumpocene’ era spells disaster for world’s primates

As Donald Trump prepares to enter the White House, there may be dark days ahead for some of the world's rarest and most beautiful primates.

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