Articles sur Hijab

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People hold up signs as they march during a demonstration in Montreal, April 7, 2019, in opposition to the Quebec government’s newly tabled Bill 21. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Clashing rights: Behind the Québec hijab debate

The proposed secular law (Bill 21) in the province of Québec appears to be directed primarily against Montreal and Québec City, and reflects a fear of strangers in Québec’s more homogeneous regions.
Coalition Avenir Québec leader François Legault on the campaign trail last September before the election that saw his party form a majority government.

In Québec, Christian liberalism becomes the religious authority

The language of the neutral and secular state in Bill 21, like its precursors, presumes an invisible Christian default for the rules around public expressions of religiosity.
A mother teaches her daughter by reading Alquran inside a mosque in Indonesia. www.shutterstock.com

Hijab in Indonesia – the history and controversies

Hijab-wearing culture in Indonesia has changed over time. The hijab is becoming much more popular, so why does it remain a source of controversy?
A student on the campus of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, trying out the hijab on World Hijab Day, 2017. AP Photo/Russell Contreras

Why Muslim women wear a hijab: 3 essential reads

For Muslim women, the hijab is not simply about religion. They may wear it for a variety of reasons. On World Hijab Day. women – Muslim and non-Muslim, are invited to experience this head covering.
Muslims can pray anywhere in the world using the prayer carpet. AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes

What are Muslim prayer rugs?

Trump recently tweeted about prayer rugs being left along the border. Many may not know the role and history of Muslim prayer rugs and why they are not likely to be left behind.
For many Muslim women, a hijab is a way of expressing resistance. AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty

Why do Muslim women wear a hijab?

Hijab is not simply about religion – women wear it for a variety of reasons.
Coalition Avenir Québec leader François Legault on the campaign trail last September before the election that saw his party form a majority government. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Québec’s push to ban the hijab is ‘sexularism’

The Québec government's push to ban the hijab is 'sexularism' and also basic nationalism – one that pits an ‘us’ against ‘them,’ where the ‘them’ represent multiple threats to the nation.
Ilhan Omar, a Somali American, who was elected from Minnesota’s 5th congressional district, will be the first woman in U.S. Congress to wear a hijab. AP Photo/Jim Mone, File

Three things we can learn from contemporary Muslim women’s fashion

The de Young Museum of San Francisco recently opened an exhibit devoted to the Islamic fashion scene. Here's how Muslim women's fashions challenge popular stereotypes.
Gap released a back-to-school ad campaign a couple weeks ago which included a picture of a young girl wearing a hijab which raised many questions for many people. Gap Inc.

Gap back-to-school ‘hijab ad’ ignites social media

Gap's recent back-to-school ad campaign was praised for its portrayal of the diversity of children. One of the girls in the ads was wearing a hijab: this raised a huge debate on social media.
Thousands of Iranian women took to the streets to protest against the hijab law in Tehran in the spring of 1979. A women’s movement has recently taken hold in Iran. Hengameh Golestan

Iranian women risk arrest: Daughters of the revolution

Iran's young "daughters of the revolution" are protesting hijab laws and demanding equal rights. They're the ultimate symbol of female resistance on this International Women's Day.
Warda Naili poses for a photograph on a city bus in Montreal. Last week, Bill 62 was passed in Quebec, outlawing the wearing of a niqab on public transit. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Quebec’s niqab ban uses women’s bodies to bolster right-wing extremism

Bill 62, a bill passed last week banning the wearing of Niqab in Québec for those seeking access to public services, is widely seen as an attack on Muslim women. Why is it even necessary?

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