Articles sur International Aids Conference 2016

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 36 articles

Young women who attended the International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa. International AIDS Society/Rogan Ward

AIDS conference 2016: the gains, the gaps, the next global steps

The focus of the 2016 International AIDS Conference has on access to necessary antiretrovirals, equity and making sure no-one is left behind. But there is a funding gap that needs to be addressed.
Activists protest the criminalisation of sex work outside the 21st International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa. International AIDS Society/Abhi Indrarajan

Why migration patterns are so important to designing responses to HIV

Mobility is not only a risk factor for HIV – it is also a structural determinant in how HIV responses are designed and implemented.
This human T cell (blue) is under attack by HIV (yellow), the virus that causes AIDS. T cells play a critical role in the body’s immune response. Seth Pincus, Elizabeth Fischer and Austin Athman, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

A cure for HIV: what science knows, and what it doesn’t

HIV research continues to search for a cure. The focus is on developing therapies to cure HIV infection or allow people with HIV to safely stop antiretroviral therapy and keep the virus under control.
Trinn Suwannapha/World Bank

Why the International AIDS Conference still matters

The International AIDS Conference is more than just a talk shop. The platform it offers for engagement between governments, scientists and civil society is of undisputable value.
Campaigns like the Lagos AIDS Walk have created awareness of HIV in Nigeria’s capital, but they are lacking in rural areas, where stigmatisation is rife. Reuters/Akintunde Akinleye

How stigma can stymie Nigeria’s efforts to extend HIV treatment

Creating HIV services at primary health-care centres in Nigeria may improve the uptake of antiretrovirals, but it won't tackle the issue of stigma.
A community health worker walks a couple through an HIV test in Malawi. Mostly men do not access these services. Baylor College of Medicine Children's Foundation–Malawi / Robbie Flick

Dying from a treatable disease: HIV and the men we neglect

In sub-Saharan Africa more women may be infected with HIV than men - but men are more likely to die because of poor testing and treatment regimes.

Les contributeurs les plus fréquents

Plus