Articles sur Kiribati

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This wood tower on Bikeman islet, in the central Pacific island nation of Kiribati, used to be on the sand. Now it’s in the water. Further out, locals fish. David Gray/Reuters

Rising sea temperatures will hit fisheries and communities in poor countries the hardest

A new study finds that even in best-case scenarios, the fishing communities most hurt by climate change are on small island nations such as Kiribati, the Solomon Islands and the Maldives.
The site of the hillfort of Vugala, northern Viti Levu island (Fiji). This was one of many hillforts in the area – home to a few hundred people according to reports from the 1840s – that were probably established around AD 1400 in response to conflict resulting from a food crisis that had come about as a result of an enduring fall in sea level. Patrick Nunn

Rise and fall: social collapse linked to sea level in the Pacific

Rising seas are one of the major concerns of Pacific Island nations, and looking at past sea-level change can help understand the future.
Too many fish in our seas, like this Pacific bluefin tuna, are being lost to over-fishing – but better management can help. Issei Kato/Reuters

If we want to keep eating tuna, the world needs to learn how to share

Over-fishing is a massive environmental and economic challenge. Fortunately, there are new solutions being trialled – including in a tuna hotspot in the Pacific.
An historian reading the government White Paper on developing northern Australia will realise we’re actually heading all the way back to the 1890s. andrew matthews/Flickr

Northern development plan shows Australia’s fraught vision of our tropics

The federal government's recent White Paper on developing northern Australia has disturbing echoes of the 1890s, a time when unbridled capitalism and indentured labour developed the North.

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