Articles sur land use

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The Ballarat Road project in Maidstone and Footscray, Melbourne, will transform vacant land into housing for people at risk of homelessness. Schored Architects

Portable units and temporary leases free up vacant land for urgent housing needs

An innovative collaboration between government, a non-profit group and philanthropists has found a way to provide urgently needed housing on land that would otherwise be left vacant for years.
Lots of parking: the extraordinary amount of valuable land used to park cars in most cities could soon be freed up for other uses. Antonio Gravante/Shutterstock

Freeing up the huge areas set aside for parking can transform our cities

Cities around the world are starting to rethink the vast areas of land set aside for parking. The convergence of several trends likely will mean this space becomes available for other uses.
The first autonomous vehicles are already upon us, but once their use becomes widespread they will change cities as surely as the original cars did. AAP/nuTonomy

Driverless vehicles could bring out the best – or worst – in our cities by transforming land use

It's clear autonomous vehicles will disrupt our cities, their land use and planning. Whether they make urban life better or worse depends on how well we anticipate and adapt to their impacts.
Perth has long had many fine parks but is losing vegetation cover in a band of increasingly dense development across the city. Ruben Schade/flickr

We’re investing heavily in urban greening, so how are our cities doing?

A new study shows major Australian cities are suffering an overall loss of green space – although some areas are doing better than others.
The travelling stock routes are a precious national resource.

Review of historic stock routes may put rare stretches of native plants and animals at risk

Australia's iconic stock routes are now public land, used for everything from conservation to recreation. A government review may change that.
As temperatures rise, will species have enough habitat to move to suitable ground? bonnyboy/flickr

Can ‘climate corridors’ help species adapt to warming world?

Animals and plants will need escape hatches to move to cooler climes as the planet warms, but few parts of the U.S. have the natural habitat available for these migrations.
Residents near the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in Minnesota and many others are concerned of the impact of mining in its headwaters. atbaker/flickr

Can nature advocates save threatened Boundary Waters wilderness – again?

Almost 100 years ago, the foundations to preserve the Boundary Waters in Minnesota for recreation were put in place. Now residents are debating whether to allow a mine in its headwaters.
While politicians like Malcolm Turnbull and Barnaby Joyce do the traditional photo-ops, fewer people than ever are taking on farming, which can no longer support vibrant rural and regional communities on its own. AAP/Tracey Nearmy

Election 2016: the issues in non-metropolitan Australia

What are the issues facing rural and regional Australia? The challenges are many and varied – and only some have made the national political agenda – but these areas deserve better than neglect.
‘Chook farms ruin lives!’. Australians consume a lot of cheap chicken, but not all of them appreciate an intensive chicken factory as a neighbour. Marco Amati

Done like a chicken dinner: city fringes locked in battles over broiler farms

As consumption has soared and prices have fallen, the realities of industrial chicken farming often clash with the values of people who live on the urban fringes where broiler farms are sited.
Sydney’s farms on the urban fringe produce 10% of the city’s fresh vegetables. Alpha/Flickr

Urban sprawl is threatening Sydney’s foodbowl

Farms on Sydney's fringes supply 20% of the city's food. That could drop by more than half if urban sprawl isn't kept in check.
The report criticises the state’s failure to adequately integrate the planning of land use development and transport priorities, but falls into the same trap itself. AAP/Melanie Foster

Australian Infrastructure Plan has some way to go to give our cities what they need

Infrastructure Australia's latest report is substantial but, critically, it fails to incorporate the transport thinking needed to develop more compact cities that work better for everyone.
There are always tensions, and sometimes outright hostility, between urban planners, the public and private sector developers. AAP/Newzulu/Peter Boyle

An uneasy marriage: planners, public and the market struggle to work well together

Tensions are mounting between the professional practices of government planners, processes of public participation and the private sector's increasing role in shaping Australian cities.

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