Articles sur Mercury

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The Blood Moon from January 31, 2018. Our second chance to see an eclipsed Moon this year is coming up on July 28. Martin George

It’s a busy night sky this July, so make sure you look up

All five five planets visible to the naked-eye are on show in the night skies over Australia, and a Blood Moon on the way too.
Pacific seabirds, such as this Great Blue Heron, can accumulate mercury in their bodies from the fish they eat. (Flickr)

Mercury decline in seabirds due to diet, not emissions controls

Mercury levels in seabirds living off the coast of British Columbia have been stable in recent years. New research suggests that this may be due to changes in their diet, not pollution control.
Coal-fired power stations, metal smelting and vehicle emissions all pump mercury into the atmosphere. REUTERS/Daniel Munoz

Australia emits mercury at double the global average

Australia is the 16th-largest emitter of mercury in the world. A huge amount comes from coal power stations – and a new report argues our pollution guidelines are hopelessly lax.
Mercury in exaggerated colour. The dark blue areas are rich in carbon. NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington

The more we learn about Mercury, the weirder it seems

Recent research explaining why Mercury is so dark raises many new questions.
This enhanced colour image shows the traces of carbon on the surface, coloured here in blue. NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington

Discovery of carbon on Mercury reveals the planet’s dark past

The discovery of carbon in the form of graphite on the surface of Mercury helps explain the mystery of why the tiny planet is so unusually dark.
The biggest source of mercury in the U.S. continues to be coal power plants. booleansplit/flickr

Are tighter EPA controls on mercury pollution worth it?

Politicians rail against the EPA, but economic analysis shows the health benefits of mercury controls – including both higher IQ and heart health – are worth billions of dollars a year.

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