Articles sur Microbiology

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Just as organisms that infect us make changes in us - we too make changes in them and they grow and adapt to their human hosts. from www.shutterstock.com

How we change the organisms that infect us

Humans play host to many little passengers. Right now, you’re incubating, shedding or have already been colonised by viral, bacterial, parasitic or fungal microorganisms - perhaps even all of them.
In us, on us and all around us. Microbes image via www.shutterstock.com.

Microbes: Our tiny, crucial allies

Long viewed simply as 'germs,' the hidden half of nature turns out to be crucial to the health of people and plants.
Tackling antimicrobial resistance relies on us tackling the interrelated areas of human, animal and environmental health. from www.shutterstock.com

Why the health and agriculture sectors need to work together to stop antibiotic resistance

The federal government is tackling antimicrobial resistance with a 'One Health' approach. But what is One Health and what can it offer that other approaches haven't?
Do we contain the most elaborate set of instructions? Genome image via www.shutterstock.com.

How many genes does it take to make a person?

The answer – fewer than are in a banana – has implications for the study of human health and raises questions about what generates complexity anyway.
It’s bacterial biofilms that give the Grand Prismatic Spring its colorful hues. Karin Sauer

Unlocking the secrets of bacterial biofilms – to use against them

The vast majority of the bacteria that surround us are not free-floating but prefer to band together in cooperative communities called biofilms. How do biofilms form and cooperate?
This attractive specimen, collected from a doorknob in New York, loved being in space. Alex Alexiev/UC Davis

Bacteria found to thrive better in space than on Earth

One common terrestrial bacterium has been found to grow in the microgravity of the International Space Station than on Earth, although it remains a mystery why.
Baby it’s warm inside … we have 200 microbes for every human cell. Agricultural Research Service

Are you overweight? The clue’s in your poo

Our personal collection of microbes is vital for gut health - but new research shows that large-scale analysis of our 'microbiomes' can show if a population is fat or lean. The answer is in sewage.
Gut bacteria can manufacture special proteins that are very similar to hunger-regulating hormones. Lighthunter/Shutterstock

How the bacteria in our gut affect our cravings for food

We’ve long known that that the gut is responsible for digesting food and expelling the waste. More recently, we realised the gut has many more important functions and acts a type of mini-brain, affecting…
You can never be too safe. government_press_office

Households are new source of antibiotic-resistant superbug

Human skin is a garden of microbes which is home to about 1,000 bacterial species. Most are benign but some invade the skin and cause illness – and of these, antibiotic resistant bacteria are particularly…
The more the merrier. NIAID

Education, breastfeeding and gender affect the microbes on our bodies

Trillions of microbes live in and on our body. We don’t yet fully understand how these microbial ecosystems develop or the full extent to which they influence our health. Some provide essential nutrients…
The make up of a person’s gut bacteria changes when they develop Crohn’s disease. Ohmega1982/Shutterstock

Good vs bad bacteria: the bugs responsible for Crohn’s disease

New links between the bacteria in your gut and disease are being made almost daily. We know, for instance, that the microbial communities residing in your intestines have a role in your mood and levels…

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