Articles sur Opioid crisis

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Rapidly advancing technologies, including artificial intelligence, robotics, 3D-printing, smart-phones, smart-homes, precision medicine and diagnostics, promise to disrupt health care as we know it. (Shutterstock)

Canadian health care needs agile leaders and bold visions for the future

In an era of rapid technological advance, devastating climate change, increasing inequality and a steadily aging society, health-care leadership development is vital.
When newborns stay with their opioid-dependent mothers in hospital, they experience improved mother-infant bonding, greater chances of breastfeeding, less severe symptoms, less medication and much shorter hospital stays. (Shuterstock)

Hospitals must adapt so infants can ‘room-in’ with opioid-dependent mothers

The evidence is clear that newborn babies do better when they 'room-in' with their opioid-dependent mothers. So why are hospitals across Canada so slow to provide this recognized standard of care?
A man walks in a back alley in Vancouver’s downtown eastside, February 2019. More people fatally overdosed in British Columbia last year compared with 2017 despite efforts to combat the province’s public health emergency. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

The opioid crisis is not about pain

A policy response focused on reducing prescription opioids will not resolve North America's opioid crisis. And it is hurting many adults who live with otherwise unbearable chronic pain.
The Chronic Pain Association of Canada has received money from Eli Lilly Canada Inc., Purdue Canada Inc. and Merck Frosst Canada. A blog post on the association’s website contains messages favourable to increased opioid use. (Flickr/Ajay Suresh)

Why Big Pharma must disclose payments to patient groups

Evidence shows that opioid manufacturers fund patient advocacy groups in Canada, distorting policies to protect public health.
Cannabis seedlings are shown at the new Aurora Cannabis facility, November 24, 2017 in Montréal. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz)

Hope for cannabis as treatment for opioid addiction

Research shows that THC and CBD in cannabis have potential to interrupt the vicious cycle of opioid addiction, dependence, withdrawal and relapse.
Few medical schools offer training in addictions medicine and most doctors feel they lack the specialist expertise to deal with the inpatient opioid crisis. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan)

How the opioid crisis is disrupting hospital care

Canadian hospitals are ill-equipped to deal with the inpatient opioid crisis. Lack of specialist addictions care puts patients and staff at risk.
A few woefully underfunded academic health sciences centres are responsible for providing complex care to patients with life-threatening illnesses as well as training future doctors and testing the latest in new surgical techniques. (Shutterstock)

Why we need academic health science centres

Canada's systems of health funding, medical training and physician compensation need an overhaul – to support vital centres of medical research and complex care.
U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams demonstrates the proper procedure for administering a nasal injection of naloxone on reporter Jennifer Lott, left, during a visit to the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, Miss., May 17, 2018. AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

Naloxone remains controversial to some, but here’s why it shouldn’t be

One study argues that naloxone increases opioid use because it protects against death from overdose. But a closer analysis shows Narcan is the number one public health tool to fight the overdose epidemic.
As doctors have learned more about the types of pain, they can better tailor treatment. Dundanim/Shutterstock.com

A way around opioids: Target the type of pain for better pain relief

As knowledge of pain and the highly addictive nature of opioids has grown, so has the knowledge grown about pain and its origins. A pain specialist explains the intricacies, and how treatment is changing as a result.

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