Articles sur Pain

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Symptoms of an illness usually improve the closer a person gets to dying. Photo by Dawid Zawiła on Unsplash

No, most people aren’t in severe pain when they die

Excruciating pain at the end of life is extremely rare. The evidence shows pain and other symptoms, such as fatigue, insomnia and breathing issues, actually improve as people move closer to death.
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Anthill 19: Pain

Pain is something everyone experiences. This episode of The Anthill podcast explores how and why it works in our brains, what kinds of drugs are being developed to reduce pain, and whether or not robots of the future should be built so that they experience pain.
Detail from a statue of the Virgin Mary cradling the body of Jesus (15th-century Slovenia). For many centuries, the pain that could accompany dying was seen as punishment for sin and ultimately redemptive.

When a ‘good death’ was often painful: euthanasia through the ages

For centuries, in Western societies, 'euthanasia' referred to a pious death, blessed by God. The pain that could accompany dying was seen as ultimately redemptive.
There are real consequences to ignoring children’s pain in hospital. These include increased sensitivity to pain, abnormal social behaviours when older and higher levels of anxiety before a future procedure. (Shutterstock)

Seven ways to soothe your child’s pain in the hospital

From broken limbs to blood tests, hospital visits can cause unnecessary pain for children. An emergency care pediatrician offers seven easy strategies for parents to lessen this pain.
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On poetry and pain

There are several ways into the book Shaping the Fractured Self: poetry of chronic illness and pain, edited by Heather Taylor Johnson. And there are many uses it might serve in the multiple worlds of poetry…
Medical procedures on your kids are stressful for you - but your stress can make their pain worse. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Parents’ reactions can lessen or worsen pain for injured kids

A study found parents who were less distressed were more able to support their child during a medical procedure, and this increased the child's ability to cope and decreased child distress and pain.
Our brains tell our bodies to move differently when we have pain. from shutterstock.com

Can the way we move after injury lead to chronic pain?

Our brains tell our bodies to move differently when we have pain. And there is emerging evidence to show changing how we move could actually contribute to the development of chronic pain.

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