Articles sur Paris 2015 climate summit

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We’ll always have Paris - arguably the year’s defining image for climate policy. Reuters/Stephane Mahe

2015, the year that was: Environment + Energy

Amid the usual doom and gloom, 2015 brought one big environmental triumph: the first truly global climate deal.
Public interest and peer pressure among countries are integral to enforcement of the Paris Agreement. Mal Langsdon/Reuters

The day after Paris: politicians hand the baton to green industries

The Paris Agreement recognizes the reality of global environmental pacts: the private sector must lead transition to low-carbon technology and civil society must keep up the pressure to act.
Bringing down the gavel, and bringing down the house: French Foreign Affairs Minister Laurent Fabius symbolically ended the Paris climate talks, applauded by UN climate chief Christiana Figueres. Reuters/Stephane Mahe

Beyond Paris: what was really achieved at the COP21 climate summit, and what next?

What's next, now that the Paris climate summit is over? We've created a special report for you, featuring two dozen of our best articles on the scientific, political and economic challenges ahead.
To decarbonise the electricity sector, Australia could increase the volume of renewables while closing old fossil fuel power stations. Wind turbine image from www.shutterstock.com

After Paris: now what for Australia’s climate policy?

Under the Paris climate agreement, Australia has stated that it will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 26-28% by 2030 compared to 2005 levels. How will we achieve this?
While low emissions technology might help coal, there are plenty of other energy sources competing in the post-Paris climate race. Coal image from www.shutterstock.com

After Paris, the future of Australian coal is downhill

Despite its vital role in the development of Australia's economy, the future of coal looks grim in a world aiming to limit warming to below 2℃.
Love between countries is more important than strong legal agreements. Ryan Rodrick Beiler / Shutterstock.com

Why soft climate deals are better than tough ones

The Paris climate deal has been criticised for not being strong enough. But behavioural economics studies show weak deals can work out better in the long run.

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