Articles sur Public hospitals

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Labor has promised A$8 billion in new health expenditure, while the Coalition has focused on the difference new pharmaceuticals can make to individual Australians. Shutterstock

What are the major parties promising on health this election?

Labor and the Coalition's health policies and campaign strategy couldn't be more different this election.
Both sides of politics have gone hard on health in the first week of the campaign. Dave Hunt/AAP

Election campaign lesson #1: don’t mess with Medicare

Medicare is a vote-changer. The Coalition learnt this in the 2016 federal election campaign and has since guaranteed its commitment to the program. But that may not avert a Mediscare 2.0.
When you’re admitted to a public hospital, they’ll want to know if you have private health insurance. From shutterstock.com

If you’ve got private health insurance, the choice to use it in a public hospital is your own

When you enter a public hospital, you are likely to be asked if you have private health insurance, and if you want to use it. This is what you need to consider.
The funding proposal is no fix for Australia’s health system but it could take some political pressure off the Coalition in the lead up to the 2019 federal election. OnE studio/Shutterstock

Morrison’s health handout is bad policy (but might be good politics)

The A$1.25 billion health funding boost isn't based on any coherent policy direction. It's designed to shore up support in marginal electorates.
Women who have had a heart attack are less likely to be given an angiogram (a special X-ray to detect blockages of the heart), rehabilitation, or medication than men. Shutterstock/Syda Productions

Women who have heart attacks receive poorer care than men

New research shows women receive sub-optimal care after they have a heart attack and are twice as likely than men to die six months after the attack.
Around 3,000 more Australian patients have a complication in their hospital care in January than in other months. Rawpixel.com

Why you should avoid hospitals in January

New medical staff start in January and may not be as skilled or adept as their predecessors, meaning more things go wrong.

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