Articles sur Public trust

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Former NSW minister Ian Macdonald (left) and union boss John Maitland are just two of the prominent figures who have been swept up in anti-corruption investigations at the state level. Joel Carrett/AAP

Australians think our politicians are corrupt, but where is the evidence?

Public trust in government is sliding and there's a perception that a small elite is reaping the benefits of political influence. This points to the need for a federal anti-corruption body.
Judge Brett Kavanaugh is a polarizing figure — either partisan Republican or impartial jurist, depending on who you ask. AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Supreme Court polarization is not inevitable — just look at Europe

Controversial judicial appointments and divisive court rulings are not the norm everywhere. Here's what the US could learn from Europe about ensuring ideological balance on the Supreme Court.
What happens to their credibility when scientists take to the streets? February 2017 Stand Up for Science rally in Boston. Adam Salsman

Can March for Science participants advocate without losing the public’s trust?

The research community tends to assume advocacy doesn't mix with objectivity. One study suggests there's room for scientists to make real-world recommendations without compromising their trusted status.
Job shadowing is one way that students can understand career options in their Rust Belt communities. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers / flickr

Building jobs in the Rust Belt: The role of education

Rust Belt youth often want to stay near home but can't find jobs. The key may be in educational initiatives that help young people find and acquire the jobs that are already readily available.
A group of youths are suing the federal government for action on climate change using a novel legal approach. AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, Photo by Robin Loznak, courtesy of Our Children's Trust

Earth on the docket: Why Obama can’t ignore this climate lawsuit by America’s youth

Legal scholars explain why a lawsuit by 21 young people against the US government, arguing for a constitutional right to a stable climate, is such a powerful idea.
Donald Trump is a spectre of things to come: of political performance in an age of projection rather than representation. EPA/Tannen Maury

Donald Trump: both the old crazy and the new normal

The faultlines in democratic politics are clear. On one side is a system of democracy that is bad at making people feel represented. On the other are anti-politician performers like Donald Trump.
Recent attacks by Peter Dutton on Greens senator Sarah Hanson-Young have gone well beyond legitimate tough criticism – they’ve been abusive. AAP/Dave Hunt

Politicians put forward their worst sides

In the latest Essential poll, just 11% have some or a lot of trust in politicians and 49% have no trust. Not a surprising result perhaps. What is surprising is that politicians don’t seem much worried…
Tony Abbott opens the campaign office for Liberal candidate Ken Wyatt in 2010. Now he and all incumbent MPs enjoy a $300,000 advantage over their challengers at the next election. AAP/Dean Lewins

Budget’s $45m slush fund for MPs is an unethical use of public money

'Better Communities' funding is supposedly non-partisan: every electorate gets $300,000 for local projects. But only incumbent MPs have a say in this spending and 60% of them are government members.

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