Articles sur Rio Olympics

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Mark Mangini (left) and David White hold this year’s Oscar for Sound Editing for Mad Max: Fury Road. Paul Buck/EPA

The price of victory: comparing the cost of Olympic gold to an elite arts prize

Amid the hand-wringing about the price of an Olympic medal, our experts crunched the numbers on the cost of success in the arts. And at A$8 million per international award, it turns out that elite culture is a lot better value than sport.
Racewalkers turn a corner – keeping one foot on the ground – during the women’s 20-km event at the 2012 London Olympics. Maureen Barlin/flickr

Don’t run (and don’t laugh): The little-known history of racewalking

Racewalking has been part of the Olympic Games since 1904, but gets little respect in the United States. That might change if Americans knew a little more about it.
Urban planning was once an Olympic event, although the first gold medal – awarded to Germany’s Alfred Hensel for the Nuremberg stadium – turned out to be an unfortunate choice.

‘No More Hunger’ Games: if only we cared about the real-world Liveability Olympics

Imagine cities competed to eliminate hunger, poverty, unemployment, crime and greenhouse emissions, and to offer housing and transport for all. Don't scoff – urban planning was once an Olympic event.
A TV cameraman shoots a Madame Tussauds Museum figure of US Olympic gold medal swimmer Michael Phelps at Banneker Pool in Washington, to coincide with the opening of the Rio Olympics on August 5. Gary Cameron/Reuters

Business Briefing: the big bucks of broadcasting the Olympics

Business Briefing: the big bucks of broadcasting the Olympics. The Conversation16 Mo (download)
The amount broadcasters will pay for the rights to the Olympics keeps going up, but is the value of the rights changing?
Training for the Olympics is time-consuming – and expensive. USA Today Sports/Reuters

How do Olympic athletes pay the electric bill?

A former Olympic gold medalist reflects on his own financial struggles as he trained and competed for the 1984 Summer Games. Thirty years later, not much has changed for many Olympians.
The bodies of Olympic athletes are becoming more specialised, more differentiated – and much more extreme. Reuters/Max Rossi

Survival of the fittest: the changing shapes and sizes of Olympic athletes

Over time, the body sizes and shapes of Olympians have been moving apart from each other at light-speed, and have become increasingly specialised and differentiated.

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