Articles sur Speed reads

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One of the signature fragrances of spring comes after the consumption of asparagus. Anton G

That distinctive springtime smell: Asparagus pee

Perhaps you've noticed something unusual in the bathroom after you consume this healthy spring vegetable. A Speed Read explains there's two parts to the stinky puzzle: production and perception.
Father Patrick Conroy. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Why does Congress have a chaplain?

Following the controversy over the resignation of House chaplain Patrick Conroy, in this speed read, scholars explain when the tradition of legislative prayer was started and how it has sustained.
Venezuelans were once among the world’s happiest people. Then the country descended into economic chaos and humanitarian crisis. Jorge Silva/Ruters

Why Venezuelans are some of the unhappiest people in the world

Venezuela – once known for its friendly people, oil wealth and beauty queens – ranks 102nd of 156 countries surveyed in this year's World Happiness Report, which measures well-being worldwide.
What secrets will your DNA give away? Connect world/shutterstock.com

Your genome may have already been hacked

When you send off a cheek swab to one of the private genome companies, you may sacrifice not just your own privacy but that of your family and your ancestors.
Former Presidents George W. Bush and George H.W. Bush attend Barbara Bush’s funeral service. AP Photo/David J. Phillip

George H. W. Bush has sepsis - why is it so dangerous?

Former President George H.W. Bush was hospitalized for sepsis, which can be serious. Just what is this disease that accounts for one-third of all hospital deaths? A speed read explains the dangers.
Sens. Bob Corker and Bob Menendez look on during the second round of questioning of Secretary of State-designate Mike Pompeo. AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Senate confirmation: The grilling can be grueling

Senate confirmation for many of President Trump's nominees has been tough. In this speed read, The Conversation asks: What is Senate confirmation, and why do we do it?
A furnace at Dalian Special Steel Co. Ltd. in China’s Liaoning province. Reuters

How transshipment may undercut Trump’s tariffs

This speed read explores why it’s hard to stop manufacturers in specific countries from dodging trade barriers by pretending that their goods come from somewhere else.
Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo, left, speaks with Deepwater Wind CEO Jeffery Grybowski in 2016. AP Photo/Steven Senne

Wind energy’s swift growth, explained

Experts expect the wind business to remain brisk in the US and abroad, on land and offshore.
Customers line up to buy gasoline in San Jose, California, on March 15, 1974, during an Arab oil embargo. The crisis spurred enactment of the first U.S. vehicle fuel economy standards. AP

Government fuel economy standards for cars and trucks have worked

Since the federal government started setting fuel economy standards, US-built cars have doubled their fuel efficiency, saving money for consumers and reducing pollution.
A farmer harvest his soybean field in Loami, Ill. AP Photo/Seth Perlman

Why China’s soybean tariffs matter

There's a good reason China took aim at US soybean exports when it announced its latest list of retaliatory tariffs.
Sinclair Broadcast Group is under fire, following the spread of a video showing anchors at its stations reading a script criticizing ‘fake’ news stories. Steve Ruark/AP Photo

Why are Sinclair’s scripted news segments such a big deal?

It’s worth looking at how local news stations have traditionally operated.

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