Articles sur US journalism

Ensemble des articles

A bust of newspaper magnate Joseph Pulitzer looks on as reporters look through a box containing the announcements of the 1996 Pulitzer Prizes at Columbia University. AP Photo/Wally Santana

The key to writing a Pulitzer Prize-winning story? Get emotional

U.S. journalism has long championed an allegiance to cold objectivity. But one researcher analyzed Pulitzer Prize-winning stories from the past 20 years and found that they’re suffused with emotion.
Democratic presidential hopeful Bill Clinton has a cup of coffee with newspaper columnist Jimmy Breslin in April 1992. Breslin died on March 19. Stephan Savoia/AP Photo

Should journalism become less professional?

After the death of legendary New York Daily News columnist Jimmy Breslin, some have lamented the end of blue-collar journalism. But in today's media environment, Breslin's approach might not be enough.
A 1941 photograph depicts the Chicago Defender’s linotype operators. Wikimedia Commons

Can the black press stay relevant?

From the treatment of black World War II veterans to Emmett Till's murder, the black press helped lay the groundwork for the civil rights movement. What role can it play today?
In the early stages of his campaign, Donald Trump eagerly made himself available to the press. As president, that’s likely to change. Joe Skipper/Reuters

Experts’ roundtable: The future of journalism in Trump’s America

How can journalists resist a master media manipulator, reach local communities and sift through fake news and propaganda? Media experts explore the challenges of covering the next administration.
For years, Talese’s subject, Gerald Foos, spied on his motel guests. 'Binoculars' via www.shutterstock.com

The murky ethics of Gay Talese’s ‘The Voyeur’s Motel’

When Gay Talese signed a confidentiality agreement with a motel-owning voyeur, he got access to the voyeur's journals and secret viewing perch. But he also allowed the spying to continue for over a decade.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton fields questions from reporters in Dover, New Hampshire. Brian Snyder/Reuters

When covering elections, journalists face a debilitating dilemma

A partisan media landscape has made it almost impossible for journalists to avoid charges of bias when calling out a candidate's dishonesty.
Hungry for information: the media, here covering the shooting in Oregon, falls into now-familiar patterns in covering mass shootings. Steve Dipaola/Reuters

The Umpqua, Oregon shootings: portrait of the killer as a young man

The media repeatedly creates instant profiles of public shooters as shy, troubled loners, perpetuating the sense of helplessness over mass killings.

Les contributeurs les plus fréquents

Plus