Articles sur Vision

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 47 articles

Everyone sees them all, but we don’t all give them the same distinct names. lazyllama/Shutterstock.com

Languages don’t all have the same number of terms for colors – scientists have a new theory why

People across the globe all see millions of distinct colors. But the terms we use to describe them vary across cultures. New cognitive science research suggests it's about what we want to communicate.
375 million years ago fishes like Tiktaalik (pictured, above) looked out above water for prey. John Long, Flinders University

The eyes have it: how vision may have driven fishes onto land

The first truly terrestrial animals evolved from ancient fishes that left the water for land. But what prompted to move has been a mystery.
Dusk during the second day of the day-night Sheffield Shield match between Queensland and New South Wales at the Gabba, Brisbane, in October 2016. AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Pink balls in day-night cricket could challenge players at sunset

New research shows pink cricket balls can be extra difficult to see in those crucial minutes when day turns to night during play.
Cataracts are one of the leading causes of visual impairment globally. Rakesh Ahuja, MD/Wikimedia Commons

Explainer: what are cataracts?

More than a million Australians have an untreated cataract and hundreds of cataract surgeries are performed daily, but what are they?
How much information is too much? And where should it go? Heads-up display image from shutterstock.com

How does a computer know where you’re looking?

Augmented reality systems need to display relevant information in a useful location. That's impossible without eye tracking.
Syda Productions/Shutterstock

Tricking the brain: how magic works

Pretty much all of our perception is an illusion, whether we’re walking down the street or attempting to decode the latest card trick.
Disney’s WALL.E needed to see all the rubbish on Earth so it could clean it up. AAP Image/Tracey Nearmy

How do robots ‘see’ the world?

Robots that can learn to 'see' the world around them -- and share their learning with other robots -- will lead the next revolution in robotics.
Australian bowler Mitchell Marsh receives the pink ball during the Test match between Australia and New Zealand at the Adelaide Oval. AAP Image/Dave Hunt

We need to ditch the pink ball in day-night test cricket

The pink ball introduced to this year's day night cricket test can be difficult to see for some players, especially if they are colour blind. There is a better choice of colour.

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