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Data from provinces varies, but it generally shows Canadian cannabis users prefer to buy dry flowers (to smoke or vape their weed), want high-quality products and prefer shopping in bricks-and-mortar stores rather than online. Sharon McCutcheon/Unsplash

How Canadians are buying cannabis and getting high now that it’s legal

Government data outline what’s popular with Canadian cannabis shoppers. Among other things, they prefer smoke-able cannabis, high-quality products and in-store shopping.
A depiction of a cannabis bud drops from the ceiling at Leafly’s countdown party in Toronto as midnight passes and marks the first day of the legalization of cannabis across Canada. (Chris Young/The Canadian Press)

Where’s the weed? Clues to Canada’s cannabis shortages

Government data suggest medical cannabis availability improved after legalization in Canada. But producers have struggled to meet demand for recreational cannabis other than oils.
Perhaps one day Humboldt pot will be as famous as Bordeaux wine. AP Photo/Richard Vogel

Can artisanal weed compete with ‘Big Marijuana’?

About two-thirds of Americans now live in states where marijuana is legal for medicinal or recreational purposes, leading some to worry corporate and Wall Street interests will take over the industry.
The new cannabis legislation in Canada does not give enough thought to those who were overly punished for cannabis-related activities. Jakob Owens/Unsplash

As cannabis is legalized, let’s remember amnesty

Now that cannabis is almost legal in Canada, many are celebrating. Before we forget, we should remember those that have been arrested for previous crimes and push for amnesty.
In less than a month, marijuana can be legally purchased from private retailers in Ontario and some other places across Canada. Are we ready for it? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Are we really ready for privatized pot sales?

As marijuana legalization looms and we we contemplate the future of cannabis sales in Canada, there are still lots of questions for both the public and government to consider.
The Joint Occupational Health and Safety Committee (JOHSC) of Thompson Rivers University in British Columbia unanimously voted on March 5, 2018 to ban all smoking of marijuana products on campus — for health and safety reasons. (Flickr/Chuck Grimmett)

Marijuana-friendly campuses? I don’t think so …

In advance of marijuana legalization in Canada, one university in British Columbia has taken a firm stance, banning all smoking of cannabis products on campus.
A man smokes a large marijuana joint during the annual 4/20 marijuana celebration on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on April 20, 2018. With legalization ahead, provinces are taking different approaches in how they sell weed to the public. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Buying pot in Ontario in 2018 will be like buying booze in 1928

Canadian provinces are choosing various approaches to cannabis sales as legalization approaches. Ontario's will combine aspects of computer stores, wine boutiques and post-prohibition liquor outlets.
A woman lights up at Sunset Beach in Vancouver, B.C., last year on April 20. A new Calgary bylaw, meantime, bans the public consumption of cannabis and restricts people to smoking weed only at home, unfairly affecting those who rent. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Calgary’s ban on public weed-smoking has a racial impact

A new Calgary bylaw prevents people from smoking weed in public; only homeowners can spark up on their private property. Here's why that unfairly targets and penalizes racial minorities.
Canada is on track to legalize marijuana on July 1. But why was it criminalized in the first place? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

How pot-smoking became illegal in Canada

Canada is legalizing marijuana on July 1. But how the drug became criminalized in the first place is an interesting saga that involves anti-Chinese racism and international influence.
Workers produce medical marijuana at Canopy Growth Corporation’s Tweed facility in Smiths Falls, Ont. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Can government-approved pot beat street weed?

In competing with Canada's black markets, legal cannabis has potential strengths and weaknesses. Most flow directly from governments' policy choices.
A 2015 study from the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse describes youth perceiving marijuana as “relatively harmless” and “not as dangerous as drinking and driving.” (Unsplash/Conor Limkbocker)

Marijuana at school: Loss of concentration, risk of psychosis

Provincial policies to implement the legal consumption of marijuana are unlikely to protect children and youth. High school teachers and parents will be on the front line.
Lack of clear evidence on impairment from cannabis use has led to vastly different workplace policies. Police officers in Ottawa and Vancouver face no restrictions on their off-work use of cannabis as long as they are fit for duty, officers in Calgary have been banned from use and in Toronto they face a 28-day abstinence period. (Shutterstock)

Cannabis in the workplace: We need an accurate measure of impairment

Will offices, construction sites and medical clinics become less safe now that marijuana is legal in Canada? Our experts review the evidence, or lack of it.
Drops of marijuana extract are placed on candy in the kitchen of AmeriCanna Edibles in 2017 in Boulder, Colorado. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Joe Mahoney)

Eating weed gummies at work? Marijuana rules may take a decade to sort out

The promised marijuana legalization date of July 2018 is approaching fast. Many outstanding regulatory issues -- such as online sales and occupational health and safety -- pose urgent challenges.
Marijuana brand name stickers are visible as customers line up at the counter in CannaDaddy’s Wellness Center marijuana dispensary in Oregon in April. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

‘Where’s the weed?’ Branding is essential for cannabis companies

There's a strong case for governments to allow cannabis producers to brand their products via packaging and advertising like any other product. It could boost quality and consumer satisfaction.

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