Articles sur Yemen

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Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman (centre) is at the centre of the changes in the Saudi royal family’s approach to governing. Stringer/Reuters

Princes, power and purges: the Saudi royal family consolidates its rule

The latest arrests of princes, ministers and military officials in Saudi Arabia might be in the name of anti-corruption but it also serves to bolster the Saudi royal family's power.
Saudi Arabia’s King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud on Oct. 5, 2017. AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin

Why is Saudi Arabia suddenly so paranoid?

When it comes to foreign policy, Saudi Arabia has recently become far more aggressive. A historian of the modern Middle East sees three possible causes for the shift.
The guided-missile destroyer USS Mason in the Suez Canal on Oct. 20, 2016, days after missiles were aimed at it from rebel-held areas of Yemen. (U.S. Navy handout)

Missile interception from Yemen to the South China Sea

Ship attacks near Yemen last October have implications for missile defence from the Atlantic to the Pacific, from Romania to Japan.
An Egyptian farmer tries to irrigate his land with water from a well. Reuters/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

A worsening water crisis in North Africa and the Middle East

At present, the Middle East and North African region contains 7% of the world's population but only has access to 1.5% of its renewable freshwater supply through rainfall.
A brother and sister take shelter from aerial attacks in the rebel-held territory of the Nuba Mountains in South Kordofan. Reuters/Goran Tomasevic

Tragedy in the Nuba Mountains: hunger and starvation are constants

The world has turned its back on the Nuba people of Sudan. Despite the critical need for food, none of the organisations involved in helping people in dire need have attempted to deliver aid to them.
An anti-U.S. protest in Yemen during Trump’s visit to Saudi Arabia. Reuters/Khaled Abdullah

Can Congress pressure the White House on human rights?

Congress is trying to curb the president's ties to human rights abusers, harkening back to landmark legislation of the 1970s.
Rules imposed after the 9/11 attacks can obstruct aid to Somalia’s internally displaced people. Omar Abdisalan/AMISOM Photo

Anti-terror rules are blocking aid to conflict zones

Rules imposed after 9/11 and still on the books are getting in the way of delivering aid to conflict zones. In countries like Yemen and Syria, it could mean the difference between life and death.
Sorting bags of food dropped by air from a World Food Programme plane in Padeah, South Sudan, March 1, 2017. AP Photo/Sam Mednick

Famines in the 21st century? It’s not for lack of food

At a time when poverty and hunger levels are declining around the world, famine is recurring, driven by conflicts and natural disasters. But timely action by governments and aid groups can save lives.
Children sit at a makeshift camp for internally displaced people in Houdhieda, Yemen. Reuters/Abduljabbar Zeyad

Yemen

In Yemen, the civil conflict will likely drag on in a stalemate between the Houthi movement in the north and the Hadi government…
Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir will likely intensify the Washington charm offensive and continue to stress Saudi Arabia’s indispensability to regional security and terrorism matters. XXSTRINGERXX Xxxxx/Reuters

Saudi Arabia

This year will continue to be a period of great uncertainty in Saudi Arabia. After a deterioration of relations with the United States under President Obama, the kingdom will be focused on strengthening…
Demonstrators outside Terminal 5 of Chicago’s O'Hare airport on Jan. 29, 2017. AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh

The best legal arguments against Trump’s immigration ban

A constitutional scholar considers the legal arguments that could undo Trump's executive order barring travel by residents of seven Muslim majority countries.

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