Supporters of president-elect Adama Barrow celebrate his victory in Banjul, the Gambia. Reuters/Thierry Gouegnon

The Gambia keeps dream of deepening democracy in Africa alive

A peaceful transition in the Gambia, taken together with hints of change in Angola and Zimbabwe, will portend hope that Africa’s democratic renewal is still alive.
Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, U.S. President Barack Obama and U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon shake hands during a joint ratification of the Paris climate change agreement in eastern China’s Zhejiang province, Sept. 3, 2016. How Hwee Young/Pool Photo via AP

For China, climate change is no hoax – it’s a business and political opportunity

Although Donald Trump has called climate change a hoax invented by China, Chinese leaders believe cutting carbon emissions will generate economic and political payoffs at home and abroad.
In rural Malawi traditional leaders have played an important role in persuading men to get involved in women’s health. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

When men tackle mother and child health: lessons from Malawi

A study in Malawi shows how the participation of local community leaders in policy development can change men's attitudes to maternal and child health for the better.
Nobel Peace Prize winner Juan Manual Santos had promised to end the conflict before the end of 2016, opposition notwithstanding. Jaime Saldarriaga/Reuters

Colombia has a new peace agreement, but will it stick?

The South American nation is poised to end its 52-year civil war after a halting peace process that has used the weapons of both war and democracy.
Maria Schneider and Marlon Brando in a scene from Last Tango in Paris. Les Productions Artistes Associés

Why we should no longer consider Last Tango in Paris ‘a classic’

Revelations of sexual abuse in the making of Last Tango in Paris give the film 'the air of a snuff piece'. Film scholars must reassess the work – there is no place for revering artistic achievement over human suffering.
Aboriginal elder Major Sumner sits outside Liverpool’s World Museum with a box containing the skull of an Australian indigenous person, taken from Australia between 1902 and 1904. Phil Noble/Reuters

Museums are returning indigenous human remains but progress on repatriating objects is slow

The question of repatriating objects is clearly more complex than returning human remains. It needs more debate, and more creative interventions to move beyond the current impasse.

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