Articles on Alzheimer's disease

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Dementia patients are often the perpetrators and often the victims of abuse. Research also shows that a medical history of head injury can more than double the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease in some populations, even after many years. (Shutterstock)

Dementia’s hidden darkness: Violence and domestic abuse

From aggressive patients with Alzheimer's to frustrated caregivers, dementia is increasingly entwined with violence in private homes and residential facilities.
Reigning Chess World Champion Magnus Carlsen, left, from Norway, and American challenger Fabiano Caruana will face off in the World Chess Championship, which begins Nov. 9 in London. Matt Dunham/AP

Myths and unknowns about chess and the contenders for the World Chess Championship

With the World Chess Championship set to begin Nov. 9 in London, Alexey Root, who teaches online courses about chess in education, tackles some myths and unknowns about the royal game.
A new study funded by the Centre for Aging and Brain Health Innovation will investigate the use of learning technologies such as streaming media for people with dementia and those at risk. (Shutterstock)

Study hard and you might lower your chances of dementia

Higher education for seniors shows promise – for combatting social isolation, increasing well-being and delaying the onset, or slowing the progression, of dementia.
People with dementia experience a range of psychological symptoms and behaviour changes. From shutterstock.com

Why people with dementia don’t all behave the same

With an ageing population, dementia is becoming more and more prevalent. But what does dementia actually do to the brain to cause changes in behaviour?
Ted Turner and former wife Jane Fonda, picture in 1991, when the high-profile couple were dating. John Barrett/PHOTOlink/ MediaPunch /IPX/AP

Ted Turner has Lewy body dementia, but what is that?

Media pioneer Ted Turner's announcement that he has Lewy body dementia brings the illness into the spotlight, which is rare. A neurologist explains why it's hard to even get a correct diagnosis.
Early-onset Alzheimer’s disease presents unique challenges, when a patient is still working or parenting children.The personality changes involved can result in job loss or divorce before a diagnosis is made. (Shutterstock)

Is that ‘midlife crisis’ really Alzheimer’s disease?

Alzheimer's disease affects many people under the age of 65. The 'young-onset' version of the disease is often misdiagnosed as depression or dismissed as a midlife crisis.
Other cultures view dementia differently. Could they help us be better caregivers? BlurryMe/Shutterstock.com

Could different cultures teach us something about dementia?

More than 16 million people in the U.S. take care of people with dementia. Could we learn something from how other cultures view dementia as more of a social disease rather than a lonely one?
Genetic testing is available to people who want to know if they carry a variant of a gene that confers susceptibility for Alzheimer’s. But knowing whether to get tested is hard. Billion Photos/Shutterstock.com

Genetic testing: Should I get tested for Alzheimer’s risk?

Alzheimer's is not only the third leading cause of death in the U.S. but also the most dreaded diagnosis. Genetic testing can help determine susceptibility, but knowing whether to test isn't easy.
HIV becomes dormant in the body and can hide in brain cells. Joseph Lebowitz, Dr. Min Lin, and Dr. Habibeh Khoshboue

HIV lies dormant in brain, increasing risk of dementia, but how?

While drugs have been developed to treat HIV and AIDS, the virus can still lie dormant in the brain, increasing the risk for brain disease such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.

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