Articles on Changing wildlife

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Icy waters off the western Antarctic Peninsula. Kathryn Smith

The march of the king crabs: a warning from Antarctica

Hundreds of meters below the surface of the freezing ocean surrounding Antarctica, the seafloor is teeming with life. The animals living there have no idea that an army is on the brink of invading their tranquil environment.
In some regions of the Arctic, polar bears will spend their entire lives on sea ice or the ocean. Christopher Michel/flickr

Polar bears unlikely to compensate for ice loss in summer

Could polar bears slip into a hibernation-like state to tough out lean hunting during summers with little sea ice? Sadly, experiment suggests no.
Waterbugs are used for the monitoring of river ecosystem health across the world. Amanda Woodman

How healthy is your river? Ask a waterbug

Around the world, waterbugs are the most widely-used indicator of environmental health and pollution of rivers, lakes and wetlands.
Not all bees are honeybees. This is a green ‘sweat’ bee. Ian Jacobs/flickr

Losing bees will sting more than just our taste for honey

Data from all over the globe suggest that bees are in decline, and we may lose a lot more than honey if bees are unable to cope with the changing climate and increasing demand for agricultural land.
The tropical orange blotch surgeon fish has been moving south into New South Wales. Graham Edgar / Reef Life Survey

Following Nemo: marine life is heading south

As warmer seas move further south, tropical wildlife is going with them, giving us a dramatic insight into how global warming is changing our oceans.

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