Articles on Commercial fishing

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Aerial imagery revealing the extent of storm damage in Dee Why on Sydney’s Northern Beaches in 2016 following wild weather. NEARMAP/AAP

A landmark report confirms Australia is girt by hotter, higher seas. But there’s still time to act

The IPCC report says extreme sea level events that used to hit once a century will occur once a year in many places by 2050. This situation is inevitable, even if emissions are dramatically curbed.
The giant freshwater prawn is native to the Indo-West Pacific from northwest India to Vietnam, Philippines, New Guinea and northern Australia. It has been introduced into many countries for aquaculture. https://www.shutterstock.com

Breeding single-sex animal populations could help prevent disease and poverty

Entire populations of prawn 'super-females' are now being commercially distributed. The science behind this continues to advance and could have a far-reaching impact on both humans and animals.
The captain of a Finnish icebreaker looks out from the bridge as it sails into floating sea ice on the Victoria Strait while traversing the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago in July 2017. The waterways of the Arctic are of particular interest to non-Arctic jurisdictions like China and the European Union. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Why the Arctic isn’t a ‘global commons’

The recent Arctic Council meeting in Finland shows there's still avid interest in developing the Arctic. Some are arguing the entire region should be considered a 'global commons.'
Ern McQuillan, Tuna Fishing at Eden, New South Wales, 1960. National Library of Australia

Plenty of fish in the sea? Not necessarily, as history shows

The history of fisheries exploitation in Australia reveals a staggering natural bounty, which has been alarmingly fragile without proper management.
Cannonball Jellyfish in the Gulf of California. Yazmin Flores for GCMP

Boom or bust in a jelly bloom market

In a changing climate, ocean populations sometimes rise and fall in unpredictable waves. Scientists, managers and fishers must make economically and ecologically sound decisions based on long-term outlooks.
Monitoring fishing vessels could be a growth industry in the tiny Pacific island nations that govern the world’s largest tuna fishery. AAP Image/Xavier La Canna

The Pacific islands ‘tuna cartel’ is boosting jobs by watching fish

A tiny handful of Pacific island nations control more than 50% of the world's tuna fishery, and their efforts to monitor international fishing vessels are set to become a major source of jobs.

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