Articles on extreme weather

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When New South Wales burned in 2013, Tony Abbott was quick to point out that individual events can’t be attributed to climate change. But they can. AAP Image/Tracey Nearmy

Unnatural disasters: how we can spot climate’s role in specific extreme events

The science of attributing extreme weather events to human-induced climate change has evolved rapidly in recent years. But how we communicate it to the public has not kept pace with this advance.
Hurricane Wilma in 2005 was the last major storm to rock Florida – and its insurance market. Carlos Barria/Reuters

When catastrophe strikes, who foots the bill?

Even though Hurricane Matthew has been downgraded to category 3, it's expected to cause substantial damage to Florida and other states in the region. The question is, who pays.
Flooding in Houston, April 18, 2016. Laurence Simon/Flickr

Has climate change really improved U.S. weather?

Extreme weather has an outsized impact on everyday life. Focusing on average weather patterns may make Americans dangerously complacent about how climate change is already affecting our lives.
Some materials and surfaces radiate much more heat (red areas) than others, as can be seen in this thermal image of Arncliffe Street in Wolli Creek, Sydney.

Building cool cities for a hot future

Hot spots occur at the scale of where people live – the building, the street, the block – which means urban design and building materials have profound implications for our health and well-being.
Extreme weather could trigger ecosystem collapse, including mass tree deaths. Dead tree image from www.shutterstock.com

Rising extreme weather warns of ecosystem collapse: study

Extreme weather will affect people and animals, as well as whole ecosystems. Research using satellites shows that ecosystems worldwide are vulnerable to collapse.
CSIRO has contributed to surprising discoveries in climate science. Pictured here is the research ship RV Investigator. AAP Image/University of Tasmania

CSIRO cuts to climate science are against the public good

CSIRO's climate science has contributed a number of important, and unexpected, findings.
Hurricane Pali churns over the eastern Pacific on January 11. NASA Earth Observatory

Why are hurricanes forming in January?

January hurricanes are rare events, but two have already formed this month. Atmospheric scientist Adam Sobel explains the conditions that generated Pali and Alex.
Places near the equator, with less natural climate variation, were the first to see humanity’s climate fingerprint. Husond/Wikimedia Commons

Ground zero for climate change: the tropics were first to feel the definite effects in the 1960s

Global warming is, by definition, experienced worldwide. But a new study shows that the tropics were the first places on earth where the human effect on climate outstripped normal climate variations.

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