Articles on Indigenous knowledge

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A team of researchers in northern Australia have documented kites and falcons, “firehawks,” intentionally carrying burning sticks to spread fire: It is just one example of western science catching up to Indigenous Traditional Knowledge. James Padolsey/Unsplash

It’s taken thousands of years, but Western science is finally catching up to Traditional Knowledge

A double standard exists concerning the acceptance of Traditional Knowledge by practitioners of Western science.
Indigenous knowledge has aided and enhanced modern science and technology for centuries, Natan Obed, president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, speaks about climate change at the global COP22 conference in Marrakech, Morocco, in November 2016. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)

How Indigenous knowledge advances modern science and technology

Traditional Indigenous knowledge and science has aided the development of modern scientific knowledge, and including Indigenous people in science is essential to its future.
Bangladesh is located in a river delta, making it both fertile and extremely vulnerable to disasters. In 2007, cyclone Sidr destroyed parts of this low-lying Bangladeshi island. UNU-EHS/Sonja Ayeb-Karlsson

Facing disasters: lessons from a Bangladeshi island

Why don't people evacuate their homes when warned of impending storm danger? To save lives, resiliency plans must understand how locals in climate-vulnerable places assess risk.
The demand for “decolonised education” may jeopardise research and learning in South Africa. Nic Bothma/EPA

What “decolonised education” should and shouldn’t mean

It's important that South African teachers, lecturers and professors develop curricula that build on the best knowledge skills, values, beliefs and habits from around the world.
A traditional rainmaker in Kenya. How can indigenous knowledge become part of university curricula? Department For International Development/International Development Research Centre/Thomas Omondi/Flickr

Decolonisation involves more than simply turning back the clock

Decolonisation of the curriculum doesn't have to mean the destruction of Western knowledge, but it's decentring. Such knowledge should become one way of knowing rather than the only way.
South African President Jacob Zuma delivers an address at the Inaugural Ubuntu Awards in Cape Town. Flickr

The search for Ubuntu in Africa’s corporate landscape

The essence of Ubuntu can best be found in Africa's informal economies. They are not dependent on western shareholders or donations, and certainly not subject to western management education.

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