Articles on marine life

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A study has shown that turtle hatchlings lend each other a flipper digging out of the sand to save energy. Banco de Imagem Projeto Tamar/Flickr

Turtle hatchlings lend each other a flipper to save energy

New research suggests turtle hatchlings work together with clutch mates to escape their underground nests.
Coral affected by black band disease, Bahamas. James St. John/Flickr

Is global warming causing marine diseases to spread?

Infectious diseases are a normal part of ocean ecosystems, just as they are on land. But climate change is altering the oceans in ways that could make marine diseases spread farther and faster.
A typical elephant shark from the Melbourne Aquarium. Wikimedia/Fir0002/Flagstaffotos

Avoiding Medusa’s gaze: what sharks can tell us about a rare human disease

Some things that develop as normal in elephant sharks and other marine life can mimic things we see in human disease. That makes these 'mutants' ideal for study to find out why things go wrong in humans.
Tuna and other top predators could run out of food in warming seas. Tuna image from www.shutterstock.com

The oceans are changing too fast for marine life to keep up

Over the past five years we've seen a significant increase in research on ocean acidification and warming seas, and their effect on marine life. Overall, unfortunately, the news is not good.
This common lionfish (Pterois volitans) was sighted more than 200km further south than expected down the NSW coast by 14-year-old scuba diver Georgia Poyner. It’s one of almost 40 verified observations she has submitted to Redmap. Redmap/Georgia Poyner

How you can help scientists track how marine life reacts to climate change

We know the warming seas are forcing some marine life to new waters, but we don't know much about how fast and how far they are moving. But now you can help scientists find the answers with Redmap.

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