Articles on Microbiome

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Sweat keeps the human body cool, but why does it stink? AP Photo/Seth Wenig

An artist’s journey into the science of sweat

What is the smell of sweat? An artist recreates the pungent body odor as an art installation.
Understanding the human microbiome will lead to breakthroughs in health care, including treatments for ailments such as irritable bowel syndrome. Shutterstock

The human microbiome is a treasure trove waiting to be unlocked

The microbiome is one of the largest organs in the body. Understanding its constituents and their functions will lead to breakthroughs in health care and well-being practices.
Reversing lactose intolerance might make it possible for adults to enjoy a milkshake again. YAKOBCHUK VIACHESLAV / Shutterstock.com

Can changing the microbiome reverse lactose intolerance?

You may think that your milk-drinking, ice cream-licking days are behind you as you battle the discomfort of lactose intolerance. But there maybe be a way to reverse the situation.
An increase in colorectal cancer in adults younger than 50 is troubling to doctors and often tragic for patients. kan-chana/Shutterstock.com

Colorectal cancer increase in younger adults: What could be the cause?

Colorectal cancer rates among older adults have been declining, but diagnoses in adults younger than 50 have increased. As Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month winds down, a researcher offers insight.
A new body of research suggests that infections in childhood, along with antibiotic use, could impact the bacteria in our intestines and raise risks of mental health challenges in later life. (Shutterstock)

How childhood infections requiring antibiotics may increase risks of mental illness

Research using massive databases -- such as the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register -- is enabling a whole new understanding of the links between life history, the gut and mental health.
Millions of Americans suffer from food allergies. Albina Glisic/Shutterstock.com

Are microbes causing your milk allergy?

There has been a dramatic rise in life-threatening food allergies in the last few decades. Antibiotics, poor diet and C-sections have all been implicated. Now new evidence points to gut microbes.
The microbes that live in our gut are essential to good health. Alpha Tauri 3D Graphics/SHutterstock.com

The key to our humanity isn’t genetic, it’s microbial

The effort to edit the genes of Chinese twins implies that all our traits are determined by our genes. But changing our diet, environment, lifestyle and microbes may have a greater effect.
A capsule with a genetically engineered bacterium for therapeutic purposes. abrakadabra / Shutterstock.com

Living drugs: Engineering bacteria to treat genetic diseases

Researchers are exploring the possibility of creating living drugs – designer microbes that can live in our guts and provide critical components that our body needs but can't make itself.
S'gaw Karen girls of Khun Yuam District, Mae Hong Son Province, Thailand. Takeaway

Immigration to US Westernizes Asian guts

When immigrants come to the US, it isn't just the people who assimilate. The microbes in their gut also become Westernized after living here. This may predispose them to diseases like obesity.
Every surface of our body – inside and out – is covered in microorganisms: bacteria, viruses, fungi and many other microscopic life forms. vrx/Shutterstock.com

Meet the trillions of viruses that make up your virome

Just because you don't have the flu doesn't mean that your aren't teeming with viruses inside and out. But what are all these viruses doing, if they aren't making you sick?

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