Articles on Press freedom

Displaying 1 - 20 of 114 articles

Australia is the only Western democracy without some form of charter of rights legislated by parliament or entrenched in the constitution. Lukas Coch/AAP

Why an Australian charter of rights is a matter of national urgency

We have a serious deficit in legal protection for human rights in Australia, rights that have been in regression for 20 years. We need a legislated charter setting out the rights we care about.
Witness K’s lawyer Bernard Collaery addresses outside the Supreme Court. Australia’s laws have shown they don’t do much to protect whistleblowers acting in the public interest. Lukas Coch/AAP

From Richard Boyle and Witness K to media raids: it’s time whistleblowers had better protection

Australian laws make it inevitable for whistleblowers to be charged whenever national security might be involved, even when the information is in the public interest.
Recent AFP raids on media outlets raised fears of a chilling effect on investigative journalism, but a new book finds it is thriving against the odds. David Gray/AAP

Why investigative reporting in the digital age is waving, not drowning

Despite media companies' revenue declining in recent years, a nine-year study reveals that the greatly feared death of investigative journalism has not occurred.
After a bruising election result for GetUp, national director Paul Oosting is in Canberra this week to work on press freedom. Joel Carrett

Politics with Michelle Grattan: Paul Oosting responds to GetUp’s critics

Paul Oosting responds to GetUp’s critics. The Conversation, CC BY29.1 MB (download)
GetUp's national director Paul Oosting joins Michelle Grattan to respond to critics who accuse the organisation of "creating an environment...[of] abuse, harassment, intimidation".
Some African journalists are concerned that foreign funders may influence what they cover and how. EPA-EFE/Jayden Joshua

Donor-funded journalism is on the rise in Africa: why it needs closer scrutiny

Western aid has resulted in an Anglo-American culture of journalism education which has proved impractical to implement in African countries with illiberal political regimes.
The government has approved a parliamentary inquiry into press freedom – a step the major media organisations have dismissed as unnecessary. Bianca De Marchi/AAP

Parliamentary press freedom inquiry: letting the fox guard the henhouse

A parliamentary inquiry into press freedom is merely a public relations exercise designed to buy time until the public anger over last month's police raids dies down.
Two Australian Federal Police officers walking out of the ABC Ultimo building after conducting a raid. David Gray/AAP

Morrison and Albanese to discuss inquiry into press freedom

Labor is proposing establishing a new parliamentary committee to look into press freedom; one that will deal with whistle blowers and have crossbench representation.
News Corp Executive Chariman Michael Miller (left), Nine Chief Executive Officer Hugh Marks (centre) and ABC Managing Director David Anderson (right) stressed unity in their fight for press freedom. Rohan Thomson/AAP

Media chiefs unite on press freedom, but will it result in any action?

The heads of News Corp, Nine and ABC talked tough on the need for stronger legal protections for journalists. But unity is meaningless unless it brings meaningful action from the government.
Senator James McGrath in the Senate chamber at Parliament House in Canberra. Mick Tsikas

Government senator urges sale of ABC city properties

Following similar comments by Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack, a senator has called for the ABC to sell its Ultimo headquarters and move to the suburbs and regional centres.

Top contributors

More