Articles on Science

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Gravity helps stars to form. UNIMAP / L. Piazzo, La Sapienza – Università di Roma; E. Schisano / G. Li Causi, IAPS/INAF, Italy

Curious Kids: how long has gravity existed?

Gravity exists because the universe is full of 'stuff' – here's how it came to be.
Not everyone trusts that science will bring benefits to society. from www.shutterstock.com

Scientists want to build trust in science and technology. The alternative is too risky to contemplate

In Australia, the next government will need to meet the challenge of refreshing the social licence between science, government and the many and diverse communities that make up our nation.
Assistant professor of chemistry Sidney Wilkerson-Hill, left, in a chemistry lab at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with Bolatito Babatunde, a student in the Chancellor’s Science Scholars program at UNC. Lars Sahl / UNC Chemistry

Here’s how to increase diversity in STEM at the college level and beyond

Researchers find promising results for two programs patterned after the Meyerhoff Scholars Program, a renowned initiative launched at UMBC in the 1980s and known to increase diversity in STEM.
‘Design for a giant crossbow.’ Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo joined art with engineering

As Leonardo da Vinci found centuries ago, scholars of art, design, engineering and science can work together for mutual benefit.
Héloïse Chochois, "Embedded with Physicists” “Physics Reimagined” coll.

Seven common myths about quantum physics

Quantum physics and its mysteries… And what if this supposedly incomprehensible science weren’t so difficult for non-scientists to understand?
Seen here with the Prime Minister, Karen Andrews is one of few recent ministers for science who has a university education in STEM. Mick Tsikas / AAP

STEM is worth investing in, but Australia’s major parties offer scant details on policy and funding

We've had ten federal ministers with titular responsibility for science since 2007 – five under the coalition and five under Labor. That variation and a lack of consistent vision has an impact.
The sea is blue because of the way water absorbs light, the way particles in the water scatter light, and also because some of the blue light from the sky is reflected. Flickr/Fiona Paton

Curious Kids: is water blue or is it just reflecting off the sky?

Photons stream from the sun and interact with all matter on Earth. Depending on what the light touches, some of the photons will get absorbed or soaked up. And some will bounce back.
Most of us make daily decisions about who we choose to work and collaborate with. So what if we used that to improve professional diversity? rawpixel / unsplash

My CV is gender biased. Here’s what I plan to do about it

A confession: I can count on a single hand the number of women I have invited to collaborate with me on publications and grants.
Our decision-making and conduct is influenced by what we read, see or hear. (Shutterstock)

Why we see hope for the future of science journalism

Science is a part of everyday life. Science journalists can do more to connect science to the public.

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